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Sennheiser HD 700 Headphones and Neumann KK 204/205 Wireless Microphone Capsules Each Nominated for TEC Award

Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that its HD 700 headphones and the Neumann KK 204 and KK 205 wireless microphone capsules have been nominated for the 28th Annual TEC awards. Sennheiser’s HD 700 headphone, which has been nominated in the new ‘Headphone/Earpiece Technology’ category, is an open, dynamic stereo headphone combining high-end sound with an innovative headphone design. The cardioid KK 204 and supercardioid KK 205 capsules, which have been nominated in the ‘Microphone Technology/Sound Reinforcement’ category, are fully compatible with Sennheiser’s 2000 Series wireless handheld transmitters.

Presented by the TEC Foundation, the TEC Awards is the pro audio industry’s most prestigious awards show honoring outstanding achievement in product innovation and sound production. The 28th Annual TEC Awards will be presented during the 2013 NAMM Show, to be held in Anaheim, Calif. in January 2013. The nominations, based on product entries by audio manufacturers, were made by a select panel of 130 professionals in numerous audio specialties. Products and projects released and in commercial use during the period of September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2012, were eligible for nomination.

Greg Beebe, president of Sennheiser USA, commented: “We are pleased that both Sennheiser and Neumann have once again been nominated for an Outstanding Technical Achievement Award by the TEC Foundation. Both the HD 700 headphone and the Neumann KK 200 Series capsules are best-in-class products, representing the pinnacle of premium sound and innovation.”

HD 700: A Wide Sound Stage with an Ultra-Fast Response
The HD 700 open, dynamic stereo headphone joins Sennheiser’s series of acclaimed audiophile headphones. A patent-pending vented magnet system manages air movement beneath the diaphragm, providing clean, controlled dynamics with ultra-low total harmonic distortion. An angled transducer design and a vibration dampening chassis offer audiophiles and mastering engineers outstanding spatial imaging without artificial coloration.

KK 204/205: Uniform over the Entire Frequency Range
The Neumann KK 204/205 microphone capsules were designed to complement Sennheiser’s renowned 2000 series wireless transmitters. The acoustic features of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads are derived from the multiple award-winning wired Neumann stage microphones, the KMS 104 and KMS 105. The KK 204, with its cardioid pattern, ensures the best possible suppression of sound originating from 180 degrees to the rear, while the supercardioid KK 205 has greater directivity, and maximizes incident sound from the front as compared to sound from the rear. Due to the “single polar pattern design,” the polar patterns are very uniform over the entire frequency range and provide excellent resistance to feedback.

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Hot Chelle Rae Turns to Neumann KK 205 Microphone Capsules for Warm, Crisp Sound

Nashville-based pop rock band Hot Chelle Rae burst onto the charts last year with its double-platinum single, “Tonight, Tonight,” off its sophomore album, Whatever. Since then, the band’s intense schedule has taken them on an almost non-stop international tour with headline appearances in Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia and Japan. Premium audio brands Neumann and Sennheiser have been along for the ride as Hot Chelle Rae’s equipment demands have become increasingly sophisticated and their fan base multiplies.

Hot Chelle Rae‘s core members have been playing together for the better part of seven years and were born into Grammy Award winning singer/songwriter families. Just two years ago, the bandmates were touring in a van and a trailer playing 1,000-capacity clubs. Their single “Tonight, Tonight” helped rocket them to the top, coming in at number one on the Billboard Adult Contemporary charts and number five on the Billboard Mainstream Top 40 charts.

With a rigorous tour schedule that now involves buses rather than small trailers, the band routinely finds themselves opening for acts like Taylor Swift and The Script when they are not playing major headline dates themselves. The band has dramatically improved the audio quality of their live performance by utilizing a combination of Neumann KK 205 capsules and Sennheiser SKM 2000 wireless transmitters for their two primary vocal positions.

“We were looking for better clarity in our vocal performances,” commented Zach Snyder, monitor engineer and production manager of Hot Chelle Rae. “We selected the Neumann KK 205 mic capsule because of its warm sound and super-cardioid pattern, which does a great job in rejecting ambient stage noise. Paired with our Sennheiser SKM 2000 transmitters, these capsules save us an incredible amount of time on sound checks since they sound great out of the box since they require very little EQ.”

Snyder, who says he likes the frequency response of the KM 205 more than any other mic capsule he’s used, expects to add a Neumann KK 204 capsule when the band adds a new keyboard player to its lineup in the near future. In addition to the Neumann KK 205s, Hot Chelle Rae maintains 16 channels of Sennheiser RF on stage: six channels on guitar, eight for wireless personal monitors and two for vocal microphones. Snyder says he plans to increase that number to 22 in the near future.

The transition to the KK 205 capsules was seamless and has been a measurable improvement: “They’re really pumped and Ryan’s [Follesé's] vocals come through extremely clear,” says Snyder. “Also having the Neumann capsules have brought us tons of credibility with other engineers!”

The acoustic features of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads are derived from the multiple award-winning wired Neumann stage microphones, the KMS 104 and KMS 105. The KK 204, with its cardioid pattern, ensures the best possible suppression of sound originating from 180 degrees to the rear, while the supercardioid KK 205 has greater directivity, and maximizes incident sound from the front as compared to sound from the rear. Due to the “single polar pattern design,” the polar patterns are very uniform over the entire frequency range and provide excellent resistance to feedback.

Photo caption:
Ryan Follesé of Hot Chelle Rae relies on a Neumann KK 205 microphone capsule, coupled with a Sennheiser SKM 2000 wireless transmitter.

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YOU’RE INVITED: Antelope Audio to Provide Sneak Preview of World’s First Atomic AD/DA Preamp at Rocky Mountain Audio Fest

Antelope Audio cordially invites you to experience a first hand, sneak preview of its groundbreaking Rubicon: the world’s first atomic AD/DA preamp. Join Antelope Audio each day at the Rocky Mountain Audio Fest where we will be conducting live demonstrations of Antelope Audio’s advanced AD/DA and clocking technologies, which are recognized and used extensively throughout the recording, mastering and film production world. In addition to showcasing the Rubicon and conducting private listening sessions of its DACs and clocking technologies, Antelope will have its renowned Zodiac Gold 384 kHz DAC on hand, which has been reviewed favorably in publications like Digital Trends, AV Guide, Stereophile and many others.

WHAT: Antelope Audio AD/DA and clocking demonstrations at Rocky Mountain Audio Fest
WHERE: Denver Marriott Tech Center, Marriott Tower Level 10, Room 1022
WHEN: October 12th through 14th, 2012 between 10:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.
RSVP HERE

Experience “True to Life” Analog to Digital Conversion
The 10 MHz Rubidium atomic clock, coupled with Antelope Audio’s proprietary clocking technology achieves at breakthrough in jitter management, providing listeners with unprecedented sound quality. The transformer-based, ultra low noise, discrete JFET phono preamp, together with the ultra-high 384 kHz sample rate A/D conversion and USB recording capability provide users with the sublime experience of digitizing their favoriate tracks, keeping the depth and warmth of the original analog recordings.

Zodiac Gold USB DAC with 384 kHz Audio Capability
Antelope’s Oven Controlled Oscillator and 64-bit clocking technology help audiophiles experience a new level of detail, sound clarity and warmth. The DAC features a plug and play USB interface that connects seamlessly to an iPad, Mac, PC, or just about any other digital media source. The 384 kHz audio capability dramatically improves the listening experience on both loudspeakers and headphones.

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Neumann KH 120 Studio Monitors Deliver Superior Midrange and Truthful Response for Classical Music Producer Leszek Wojcik

Since the early 1970s, Leszek Wojcik has been recording exquisite classical music performances at top venues including Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, The Rose Theater and Carnegie Hall, where he is employed as recording studio manager. Wojcik, who is also a highly sought after freelance classical recording professional, recently acquired a pair of Neumann KH 120 monitors.

Wojcik had been using a competitor’s pair of monitors, but ‘never really fell in love with them.’ He decided to switch to the Neumann KH 120s after one of his classical recording colleagues, Mateusz Zechowski, recommended them, citing their outstanding transparency and natural sound. Since then, they have become a foundational element of his control room and he’s never looked back.

“It took me about 15 seconds to make the decision to switch to the Neumann KH 120s,” Wojcik says. “The midrange is fantastic. It’s very truthful and flat, which is critical in recording classical music. For me, the midrange is the single most important part of a monitor’s sound, because most of the compositions in Western music were written for this range.”

Wojcik, who has a master’s degree in Tonmeister Studies from Chopin Music Academy and who lectures on “Aesthetics of Recording” at New York University, is well versed in both the theory and practice of audio recording and draws from over three decades of experience: “I come from the school that encourages making your decisions based on listening,” says Wojcik. “No two situations are the same in classical music recording so you have to keep searching for the perfect sound and you do this by listening. For this reason, the main component of the control room are the monitors, and the Neumann KH 120s are a great tool.”

Wojcik’s first field test of the KH 120 came during the recording of a performance of an orchestra from Qatar at the United Nations General Assembly Hall in New York City. Wojcik set up his Neumann KH 120s in an alcove adjacent to the hall where he monitored the recording and also sent out a stereo broadcast mix for television. While he was monitoring at low levels, he says that the KH 120s performed admirably, providing a dynamic sound that simplified his job.

For Wojcik, having the right mix of tools is an absolute prerequisite to creating the vibrant recordings he has become known for in the industry. “I’m sure that the chisel and the hammer that Michelangelo used to create his statues were the highest possible quality of the time, and for me, the Neumann KH 120 is a wonderful tool to have — it’s like Michelangelo’s chisel,” Wojcik said.

In addition to the Neumann KH 120 monitors, Wojcik relies heavily on other Neumann and Sennheiser equipment such as Neumann KM series microphones, Sennheiser MKH series microphones — including the Sennheiser multi-pattern MKH 8000 which he uses on the ‘most demanding’ instruments — and a pair of classic Sennheiser HD 580 headphones.

“The basic premise of classical music recording is concert realism,” Wojcik concludes. “The recording should reflect the concert sound. If you go to the ideal concert hall, sit in the ideal seat in the ideal distance from the performance, this is how you should expect to hear a well made recording. Your skill and your choice of tools is immensely important. In my work as a recording recording professional, the Neumann KH 120s are a very important tool for me.”

Image caption:
Leszek Wojcik recording on location with his Neumann KH 120 monitors at the United Nations General Assembly Hall in New York City.

Lights Out for the Minimoog Voyager Select Series

Today Moog Music announced its plans to discontinue production of the Minimoog Voyager Select Series, the top selling backlit analog synthesizer of all time. Over the last 6 years the Select Series has been used in studios and on stages around the globe. Whether it’s Madonna, Dr. Dre, Alicia Keys, CeeLo Green, Lady Gaga or Sugarland, the custom combinations of color and finish reflects the unique aesthetic and personality of its owner. Moog will continue building the Select Series through the end of the year, with the final Select Series leaving the factory on Jan 1, 2013.

This is the last chance ever for prospective buyers to purchase a Select Series Voyager, but it will also be their best chance. During the remaining months of production, Moog has reduced the selling price on all Select Series Voyagers from $3,659 to $2,999.
 
“We felt it was important to give musicians who had always dreamt of customizing a handcrafted Voyager a final chance to build one at an unprecedented price,” said Mike Adams, CEO Moog Music Inc. “We are a small company that still builds by hand, so sometimes we have to make hard decisions about ending the life of even our most favorite products. However, history has shown that discontinued Minimoogs, like the Model D and the Old School, have a tendency to become highly sought after collector’s items. I’m sure we’ll see them on stages and in studios for years to come.” said Adams.
 
The discontinuation of the Select Series comes just as Moog begins celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Minimoog Voyager. The first Minimoog Voyager introduced the world to the next generation of analog synthesizers in 2002. To honor this milestone, Moog has created an interactive ten-year retrospective containing the untold history of the Voyager, artist profiles and performances, free gifts, and other announcements that are yet to come.
 
About the Sale:
Minimoog Voyager Select Series will be gone by 2013. Until that time the price has been reduced from $3,659 to $2,999. Available direct from the Moog website http://www.moogmusic.com/products/minimoog-voyagers/minimoog-voyager-select-series or your favorite Moog Dealer http://moogmusic.com/dealers/

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While in the Announcer Booth, Rob Reider — ‘The Voice of Aviation’ — Depends on Sennheiser for Unsurpassed Comfort and Clarity

If you’ve ever been to an aviation show, you’ve very likely heard the warm, hospitable and instantly recognizable voice of Rob Reider, the most famous and accomplished aviation announcer in North America. Reider, who has announced no less than 135 air shows in the past five years alone, has brought the excitement of aviation into the hearts of millions of fans over the course of his aviation announcing career, which is already well into its third decade. Reider is a recipient of The International Council of Air Show’s “Sword of Excellence” award — the highest honor an air show professional can receive. On the announcer’s stand, he relies solely on Sennheiser headsets to make sure his communication with the fans and the control tower is perfectly clear.

When did you first experience a passion for aviation?
I have been an aviation fan since I was a kid when my dad got me interested. He soloed in a Piper Cub after WWII, but never got his private pilot’s license. He took me to the Air Force museum a long, long time ago when it was nothing compared to what it is now. So my passion kind of grew from there, and from watching the Sky King television show back in the ’50s. It all stayed with me.

Tell me about the ‘power of the voice’ as relates to announcing aviation.
The power of the voice is what engages people and it’s especially good when it is balanced with the visual. I’ve learned when to shut up at times and just let the airplanes make the music. In the case of air shows, people often don’t know what it is that they are seeing. If I can bring them closer to what they are seeing, then it becomes way more than ‘radio with pictures.’ Audio is absolutely fundamental. If you are watching a television show and if the sound goes away, you can lose the story pretty quickly; but if the picture goes away and you still have the sound, you can stay involved with the story.

How did you first come to use Sennheiser headsets in the booth?
I used to wear both an over the ear headphone and ear bud from a competitor. If the air boss wanted to talk to me, I had to pull the bud out of an ear, take the whole ear cup off, then jam it all back in. When I had the opportunity to try a Sennheiser headset, an HMD 26, it was so easy to take on and take off. Perhaps more importantly, it was comfortable, not heavy and sounded infinitely better than the competitor’s. Since then I have not gone back. I no longer have to worry about all that stuff on my ears and all these cords coming down – now I’ve got my dark glasses and my Sennheiser headset with just one wire. I have it set up so I can communicate directly with everyone I need to, I can run my own music and communicate through the PA system and it’s all seamless. I am now in my second full season using the Sennheiser HMD 26s, which are part of Sennheiser’s HME/C 26 family of broadcast and pilot’s headsets. I couldn’t be happier that I made the change.

How important is intelligibility and clarity for you?
With the HMD 26, I can always hear myself very clearly. If I cannot hear myself, I will lose my voice — this is the biggest danger for me. So having good headphones so I can hear myself well not only makes for a better experience for the audience but also really protects my chops. As far production is concerned, the timing is crucial. So I can’t afford to miss a cue and the audio — and in this sense, the audio is everything. The music starts and its, “Ladies and Gentlemen, the aerial entertainment continues at….” The microphone on the HMD 26 sounds awesome; I don’t have to EQ at all compared to the mics I used to use.

How about comfort? Where does this come into play?
The headphones have to be comfortable otherwise I will get fatigued and will be miserable by the end of the day. I’m wearing this thing sometimes 6 hours a day — as long or longer than any other sportscaster ever does. Ever since I switched to Sennheiser the comfort hasn’t been an issue and I never have to think about it.

What keeps you going, having done aviation announcing for so long?
I still get goose bumps doing this job and even though I have been doing this a long time, I am so far from jaded. I am a little kid who has found a way to make money doing what he loves to do. I don’t get nervous anymore but I try to get into the zone as quickly as possible.

    Caption:

Rob Reider, pictured with his Sennheiser HMD 26 aviation headset.

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Perfect for orchestral recordings – the MKH 8090 wide cardioid condenser microphone from Sennheiser

Audio specialist Sennheiser is expanding its MKH studio microphone series with the addition of the MKH 8090, whose wide cardioid pick-up pattern makes it the ideal microphone for orchestral recordings. The RF condenser microphone is perfectly suited as both a main and a spot microphone. An optional screw-on module can be used to convert it into a digital AES42 microphone.

“The MKH 8090 combines omni-directional and cardioid pick-up patterns to produce an impressive orchestral microphone,” explained Kai Lange, product manager for wired microphones at Sennheiser. “Used as a main microphone, it picks up the entire sound body and a healthy proportion of room acoustics, while as a spot microphone it has sufficient directivity to screen out other sound sources without making the recording sound too ‘narrow’.”

Meticulous sound tuning
One of those responsible for fine-tuning the microphone was tonmeister Gregor Zielinsky, International Recording Applications Manager at Sennheiser: “During the development of the MKH 8090, we focused on ensuring that the sound perception of the microphone is precisely between that of the omni-directional MKH 8020 and the cardioid MKH 8040. Through further fine-tuning, we succeeded in creating a microphone with a sound that seems to ‘shine’, and which has great presence and musicality.”

Accessories for (almost) every application
The MKH 8090 benefits from the wide range of accessories available for the 8000 series, such as microphone stands with different heights, various microphone clips, a shock mount, remote cables with different lengths, windshields and accessories for ceiling mounting.

Also available as an accessory is the MZD 8000 digital module, which converts the audio signal of the MKH 8090 into a digital signal according to the AES42 standard (Mode 2) directly at the microphone head, thus ensuring a lifelike, natural sound entirely without cable losses or interference from other sources.

Sennheiser’s MKH series works according to the RF principle, which Sennheiser has been using for more than 50 years and has developed to absolute perfection, for example through the use of symmetrical transducers.

The MKH 8090 will be available in October and will cost $1,199.95.

Sennheiser launches Digital 9000 wireless system at IBC

Last week at IBC in Amsterdam, audio specialist Sennheiser unveiled Digital 9000, a digital wireless system that can transmit completely uncompressed audio, artifact-free and with superb dynamics. Targeting broadcasting professionals, (musical) theatres and high-profile live audio events, Digital 9000 sets a new benchmark in digital wireless transmission. The system, which includes the EM 9046 receiver, SKM 9000 handheld and SK 9000 bodypack transmitters, and a comprehensive suite of accessories, has been meticulously designed for the highest channel counts in today’s increasingly dense frequency environment.

“This system is a masterpiece, both in the digital and in the wireless realm,” said Kevin Jungk, portfolio manager for wireless microphones at Sennheiser. “It offers unprecedented sound quality and ease of use. For example, users will no longer have to calculate and circumvent intermodulation frequencies but can conveniently place their transmission frequencies in an equidistant grid.”

Ideal for the most diverse environments
The groundbreaking digital wireless system is fitted with two transmission modes to suit any need and environment. The High Definition (HD) mode will transmit entirely uncompressed, artifact-free audio, rivaling a high-quality cabled microphone. The Long Range (LR) mode has been designed for difficult transmission environments with many sources of interference. It ensures maximum range with a proprietary Sennheiser digital audio codec. “This refined codec ensures an audio quality that is superior to that of an FM system,” explained Kevin Jungk. “These two modes make Digital 9000 the most versatile digital wireless system available, and the best adapted to on-site requirements.”

Built-in ease of use
In addition to IR synchronization between receivers and transmitters and a convenient antenna loop-through for creating larger receiving systems, Digital 9000 offers a number of groundbreaking features. First and foremost, the system does not generate any intermodulation products – the high linearity of the entire system, from transmitters to antennas and receivers, and a special transmitter design make laborious intermodulation calculation a thing of the past. Transmission frequencies can now be evenly spaced without generating intermodulation, maximizing channel count in congested RF environments.

The receiver also automatically measures the RF cable loss between the receiver and the booster and adjusts the gain accordingly. “This makes the RF wireless system easier to operate for users with less RF knowledge” said Kevin Jungk.

Optimum control – more information on the receiver
A large display with clearly laid out controls is at the heart of the EM 9046 receiver. Three display modes ensure that the RF or sound engineer has an optimum overview of important parameters in live situations and can change settings quickly via an intuitive, icon-based menu. One or more channels can be monitored at a time via the headphone output.

The modular EM 9046 receiver is a mainframe that accommodates up to eight receivers internally. The receiver system covers the UHF range from 470 to 798 MHz (328 MHz band­width). To easily integrate the system into an existing infrastructure, the user can choose between transformer-balanced analog or digital AES3 audio output modules, or a mix of both.

System set-up is facilitated by a built-in graphical spectrum analyzer to scan the RF landscape, and an RF level recorder for checking reception and optimizing antenna positions. The receiver will also suggest the best transmission mode for the environment being worked in, and will automatically set an appropriate gain to counteract RF cable losses. The system’s antenna boosters can be controlled via the receiver, which is helpful for installations with remote antenna positions.

Digital 9000 also offers encrypted data transmission, with proprietary keys generated randomly. With encryption engaged, transmission of sensitive information can be protected against hijacking and tapping.

The receiver stores up to ten complete system configurations so that set-ups can easily be recalled and repeated.

Powerful sound – more information on the handheld
The SKM 9000 handheld transmitter is compatible with all evolution wireless G3 and 2000 Series microphone heads, including the Neumann capsules KK 204 and KK 205. This means that an artist’s favorite sound can easily be transferred to the new system. Besides these capsules, the handheld can be fitted with four dedicated 9000 Series capsules.

“The 9000 Series would not have been complete without the sound of our most successful live capsule, and I am happy that the cardioid dynamic MD 9235 is part of our new digital system,” said Kevin Jungk. The rock ’n’ roll sound of the MD 9235 is complemented by the transparency of three permanently polarised condenser mic heads, the ME 9002 (omni), ME 9004 (cardioid) and ME 9005 (super-cardioid). The condenser heads feature a low susceptibility to pops and have extremely low handling noise due to snowflake-shaped rubber suspensions above and below the actual capsules.

The rugged SKM 9000 comes with an 88 MHz switching bandwidth, and is available in black and nickel. Command switch versions for easy communication between broadcast units or artists and their crews are also available. As the handheld transmits digitally, it does not employ a compander and is exempt from the associated noise, ensuring a cable-like purity of sound.

Versatile and lightweight – more information on the bodypack
The SK 9000 bodypack transmitter is easy to hide and easy to attach; it comes in a magnesium housing that combines maximum robustness with low weight. The transmitter can be used with any clip-on or headset mic with a 3-pin Lemo connector and has a line input for guitars or other instruments. “As the system is able to deliver cable-like audio, we have added a three-step guitar cable emulation – to round off the perfect instrument sound,” explained Kevin Jungk.

The SK 9000 is available in four different frequency ranges (88 MHz switching bandwidth); a command switch for communication between crews and artists/reporters is available as an accessory.

Selective and reliable – more information on boosters and antennas
To protect Digital 9000 against unwanted frequencies and interference, the AB 9000 antenna booster has been fitted with eight highly selective filters to allow just a specific frequency window to pass. Unwanted signals are thus blocked out before the first active component, adding to the overall excellent reliability of the system. The filter can be set manually on the booster or remotely via the antenna cable on the receiver.

The AB 9000 provides a maximum gain of 17 dB and is available as a stand-alone booster or integrated into the A 9000 omni-directional antenna and the AD 9000 directional antenna. Two booster versions (470 to 638 MHz and 630 to 798 MHz) cover the receiver’s UHF range.

Power supply – more information on batteries and chargers
The transmitters of the 9000 Series operate on environmentally friendly lithium-ion rechargeable battery packs, with a precise remaining operating time indicated on both the transmitter and the receiver. The SKM 9000 is powered via the BA 60 rechargeable battery pack, which will provide 5.5 hours of operating time. The SK 9000 bodypack is powered by the BA 61, which lasts for 6.5 hours. Operation on standard batteries is possible too.

The L 60 charger will recharge two BA 60 or BA 61 in any combination. It reaches 70% of charge in an hour and full charge after three hours, with the charging status being indicated by three-colour LEDs. Up to four chargers can be daisy-chained and powered via a single power supply unit.

Spectrum-efficient wireless
“Summing up, Digital 9000 is a meticulously designed wireless tool,” said Kevin Jungk. “Spectrum is a scarce resource, therefore every part of the system has been designed for the highest frequency efficiency. We have put much effort into allocating the largest possible data rate to the actual sound transmission, ensuring the unmatched audio performance of Digital 9000. Because audio is what it’s all about.”

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MKE 600 shotgun microphone for video journalists

The new MKE 600 shotgun microphone from audio specialist Sennheiser provides video journalists with a microphone that can master even the toughest video sound challenges. Its high level of directivity ensures that it picks up sound from the camera direction with minimal background noise. The switchable low-cut filter makes sure that handling and wind noise is also minimized. Users can expect a very lifelike, full-bodied sound with good bass response, as well as pleasant speech reproduction with high intelligibility.

“Reporting and media productions have an increasingly broad base nowadays, with information needing to be transmitted extremely quickly. This means that the technology used has to be as uncomplicated as possible,” explained Kai Lange, Product Manager Wired Microphones at Sennheiser. “With the MKE 600, we are presenting the ideal microphone for video journalists who want to produce a report or a film in perfect video and audio quality but do not wish to resort to highly professional shotgun microphones or a separate wireless link. In developing the MKE 600, we paid particular attention to achieving a high level of directivity and a balanced sound.”

A shock mount with an integral flashmount adapter is included to enable the sturdy MKE 600 to be fixed to a video camera without difficulties. The special design of the shock mount prevents handling noise from being transmitted to the microphone. Like any other shotgun microphone, the MKE 600 can also be used on a microphone boom.

Independent of phantom powering
For cameras that do not provide phantom power, the MKE 600 can be powered by a standard AA battery. A switch is provided to deactivate the battery power when the camera is not in use, thus preventing the battery from being discharged. An LED on the battery switch (“Low Batt”) indicates when the battery voltage is low, at which point the video journalist still has a reserve of around eight hours – “built-in recording security,” as Kai Lange explained.

Professional accessories
The MKE 600 comes fully equipped with a foam windshield that reduces wind noise by around 25 dB; the shock mount and a carrying case are also included. For outside broadcasting, a ‘blimp’ basket windshield (MZH 600) – a combined foam windshield and hairy cover that reduces wind noise more effectively than a foam windshield – is available as an optional accessory. A further option is a coiled connecting cable (KA 600) from an XLR-3 connector to a 3.5 mm jack plug.

The MKE 600 will be available in the U.S. at B&H Photo / Video in late September.

Professional sound for video filming: the MKE 600 camera microphone from Sennheiser

Whether it is an afternoon at the zoo, a special holiday video or your very own video documentary, a video camera is always a treasured companion on such special occasions and creative projects. And discerning video enthusiasts often have the highest demands when it comes to sound quality in particular. To meet these demands, audio specialist Sennheiser just unveiled a new camera microphone at IBC in Amsterdam: the MKE 600 shotgun microphone.

“The MKE 600 was developed for video journalists who want superior sound quality coupled with uncomplicated handling – benefits that amateur video enthusiasts will also appreciate,” said Kai Lange, product manager wired microphones at Sennheiser. “In developing the MKE 600, we paid particular attention to achieving a high level of directivity and a balanced sound.”

Top-quality sound for successful videos
The shotgun microphone offers a very lifelike, full-bodied sound with good bass reproduction, while ensuring pleasant speech reproduction with high intelligibility. Thanks to its high level of directivity, the MKE 600 will pick up sound from the camera direction while avoiding unwanted background noise – making sure that the sound is always right next to the image. Handling and wind noise is significantly reduced by a switchable low-cut filter.

Independent of phantom powering
As not all video cameras provide phantom power for a microphone, phantom power for the MKE 600 can also be supplied by a standard AA battery. A switch is provided to deactivate the battery power when the camera is not in use, thus preventing the battery from being discharged. An LED on the battery switch (“Low Batt”) indicates when the battery voltage is low, after which there is still a reserve of around eight hours – plenty of time to complete a video even if you do not have a new battery readily available.

Professional accessories
The MKE 600 comes fully equipped with a foam windshield that reduces wind noise by around 25 dB. Also included is a carrying case and an elastic shock mount with an integral flashmount adapter for fixing the sturdy MKE 600 to the video camera. The special design of the shock mount prevents handling noise from being transmitted to the microphone.

For outdoor videos, a ‘blimp’ (MZH 600) – a combined foam/hairy cover windshield – which reduces wind noise more effectively than a foam windshield – is available as an optional accessory. A further option is a coiled connecting cable (KA 600) from an XLR-3 connector to a 3.5 mm jack plug.

The MKE 600 will be available at B&H Photo / Video beginning in late September.

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