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Sennheiser launches Digital 9000 wireless system at IBC

Last week at IBC in Amsterdam, audio specialist Sennheiser unveiled Digital 9000, a digital wireless system that can transmit completely uncompressed audio, artifact-free and with superb dynamics. Targeting broadcasting professionals, (musical) theatres and high-profile live audio events, Digital 9000 sets a new benchmark in digital wireless transmission. The system, which includes the EM 9046 receiver, SKM 9000 handheld and SK 9000 bodypack transmitters, and a comprehensive suite of accessories, has been meticulously designed for the highest channel counts in today’s increasingly dense frequency environment.

“This system is a masterpiece, both in the digital and in the wireless realm,” said Kevin Jungk, portfolio manager for wireless microphones at Sennheiser. “It offers unprecedented sound quality and ease of use. For example, users will no longer have to calculate and circumvent intermodulation frequencies but can conveniently place their transmission frequencies in an equidistant grid.”

Ideal for the most diverse environments
The groundbreaking digital wireless system is fitted with two transmission modes to suit any need and environment. The High Definition (HD) mode will transmit entirely uncompressed, artifact-free audio, rivaling a high-quality cabled microphone. The Long Range (LR) mode has been designed for difficult transmission environments with many sources of interference. It ensures maximum range with a proprietary Sennheiser digital audio codec. “This refined codec ensures an audio quality that is superior to that of an FM system,” explained Kevin Jungk. “These two modes make Digital 9000 the most versatile digital wireless system available, and the best adapted to on-site requirements.”

Built-in ease of use
In addition to IR synchronization between receivers and transmitters and a convenient antenna loop-through for creating larger receiving systems, Digital 9000 offers a number of groundbreaking features. First and foremost, the system does not generate any intermodulation products – the high linearity of the entire system, from transmitters to antennas and receivers, and a special transmitter design make laborious intermodulation calculation a thing of the past. Transmission frequencies can now be evenly spaced without generating intermodulation, maximizing channel count in congested RF environments.

The receiver also automatically measures the RF cable loss between the receiver and the booster and adjusts the gain accordingly. “This makes the RF wireless system easier to operate for users with less RF knowledge” said Kevin Jungk.

Optimum control – more information on the receiver
A large display with clearly laid out controls is at the heart of the EM 9046 receiver. Three display modes ensure that the RF or sound engineer has an optimum overview of important parameters in live situations and can change settings quickly via an intuitive, icon-based menu. One or more channels can be monitored at a time via the headphone output.

The modular EM 9046 receiver is a mainframe that accommodates up to eight receivers internally. The receiver system covers the UHF range from 470 to 798 MHz (328 MHz band­width). To easily integrate the system into an existing infrastructure, the user can choose between transformer-balanced analog or digital AES3 audio output modules, or a mix of both.

System set-up is facilitated by a built-in graphical spectrum analyzer to scan the RF landscape, and an RF level recorder for checking reception and optimizing antenna positions. The receiver will also suggest the best transmission mode for the environment being worked in, and will automatically set an appropriate gain to counteract RF cable losses. The system’s antenna boosters can be controlled via the receiver, which is helpful for installations with remote antenna positions.

Digital 9000 also offers encrypted data transmission, with proprietary keys generated randomly. With encryption engaged, transmission of sensitive information can be protected against hijacking and tapping.

The receiver stores up to ten complete system configurations so that set-ups can easily be recalled and repeated.

Powerful sound – more information on the handheld
The SKM 9000 handheld transmitter is compatible with all evolution wireless G3 and 2000 Series microphone heads, including the Neumann capsules KK 204 and KK 205. This means that an artist’s favorite sound can easily be transferred to the new system. Besides these capsules, the handheld can be fitted with four dedicated 9000 Series capsules.

“The 9000 Series would not have been complete without the sound of our most successful live capsule, and I am happy that the cardioid dynamic MD 9235 is part of our new digital system,” said Kevin Jungk. The rock ’n’ roll sound of the MD 9235 is complemented by the transparency of three permanently polarised condenser mic heads, the ME 9002 (omni), ME 9004 (cardioid) and ME 9005 (super-cardioid). The condenser heads feature a low susceptibility to pops and have extremely low handling noise due to snowflake-shaped rubber suspensions above and below the actual capsules.

The rugged SKM 9000 comes with an 88 MHz switching bandwidth, and is available in black and nickel. Command switch versions for easy communication between broadcast units or artists and their crews are also available. As the handheld transmits digitally, it does not employ a compander and is exempt from the associated noise, ensuring a cable-like purity of sound.

Versatile and lightweight – more information on the bodypack
The SK 9000 bodypack transmitter is easy to hide and easy to attach; it comes in a magnesium housing that combines maximum robustness with low weight. The transmitter can be used with any clip-on or headset mic with a 3-pin Lemo connector and has a line input for guitars or other instruments. “As the system is able to deliver cable-like audio, we have added a three-step guitar cable emulation – to round off the perfect instrument sound,” explained Kevin Jungk.

The SK 9000 is available in four different frequency ranges (88 MHz switching bandwidth); a command switch for communication between crews and artists/reporters is available as an accessory.

Selective and reliable – more information on boosters and antennas
To protect Digital 9000 against unwanted frequencies and interference, the AB 9000 antenna booster has been fitted with eight highly selective filters to allow just a specific frequency window to pass. Unwanted signals are thus blocked out before the first active component, adding to the overall excellent reliability of the system. The filter can be set manually on the booster or remotely via the antenna cable on the receiver.

The AB 9000 provides a maximum gain of 17 dB and is available as a stand-alone booster or integrated into the A 9000 omni-directional antenna and the AD 9000 directional antenna. Two booster versions (470 to 638 MHz and 630 to 798 MHz) cover the receiver’s UHF range.

Power supply – more information on batteries and chargers
The transmitters of the 9000 Series operate on environmentally friendly lithium-ion rechargeable battery packs, with a precise remaining operating time indicated on both the transmitter and the receiver. The SKM 9000 is powered via the BA 60 rechargeable battery pack, which will provide 5.5 hours of operating time. The SK 9000 bodypack is powered by the BA 61, which lasts for 6.5 hours. Operation on standard batteries is possible too.

The L 60 charger will recharge two BA 60 or BA 61 in any combination. It reaches 70% of charge in an hour and full charge after three hours, with the charging status being indicated by three-colour LEDs. Up to four chargers can be daisy-chained and powered via a single power supply unit.

Spectrum-efficient wireless
“Summing up, Digital 9000 is a meticulously designed wireless tool,” said Kevin Jungk. “Spectrum is a scarce resource, therefore every part of the system has been designed for the highest frequency efficiency. We have put much effort into allocating the largest possible data rate to the actual sound transmission, ensuring the unmatched audio performance of Digital 9000. Because audio is what it’s all about.”

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MKE 600 shotgun microphone for video journalists

The new MKE 600 shotgun microphone from audio specialist Sennheiser provides video journalists with a microphone that can master even the toughest video sound challenges. Its high level of directivity ensures that it picks up sound from the camera direction with minimal background noise. The switchable low-cut filter makes sure that handling and wind noise is also minimized. Users can expect a very lifelike, full-bodied sound with good bass response, as well as pleasant speech reproduction with high intelligibility.

“Reporting and media productions have an increasingly broad base nowadays, with information needing to be transmitted extremely quickly. This means that the technology used has to be as uncomplicated as possible,” explained Kai Lange, Product Manager Wired Microphones at Sennheiser. “With the MKE 600, we are presenting the ideal microphone for video journalists who want to produce a report or a film in perfect video and audio quality but do not wish to resort to highly professional shotgun microphones or a separate wireless link. In developing the MKE 600, we paid particular attention to achieving a high level of directivity and a balanced sound.”

A shock mount with an integral flashmount adapter is included to enable the sturdy MKE 600 to be fixed to a video camera without difficulties. The special design of the shock mount prevents handling noise from being transmitted to the microphone. Like any other shotgun microphone, the MKE 600 can also be used on a microphone boom.

Independent of phantom powering
For cameras that do not provide phantom power, the MKE 600 can be powered by a standard AA battery. A switch is provided to deactivate the battery power when the camera is not in use, thus preventing the battery from being discharged. An LED on the battery switch (“Low Batt”) indicates when the battery voltage is low, at which point the video journalist still has a reserve of around eight hours – “built-in recording security,” as Kai Lange explained.

Professional accessories
The MKE 600 comes fully equipped with a foam windshield that reduces wind noise by around 25 dB; the shock mount and a carrying case are also included. For outside broadcasting, a ‘blimp’ basket windshield (MZH 600) – a combined foam windshield and hairy cover that reduces wind noise more effectively than a foam windshield – is available as an optional accessory. A further option is a coiled connecting cable (KA 600) from an XLR-3 connector to a 3.5 mm jack plug.

The MKE 600 will be available in the U.S. at B&H Photo / Video in late September.

Professional sound for video filming: the MKE 600 camera microphone from Sennheiser

Whether it is an afternoon at the zoo, a special holiday video or your very own video documentary, a video camera is always a treasured companion on such special occasions and creative projects. And discerning video enthusiasts often have the highest demands when it comes to sound quality in particular. To meet these demands, audio specialist Sennheiser just unveiled a new camera microphone at IBC in Amsterdam: the MKE 600 shotgun microphone.

“The MKE 600 was developed for video journalists who want superior sound quality coupled with uncomplicated handling – benefits that amateur video enthusiasts will also appreciate,” said Kai Lange, product manager wired microphones at Sennheiser. “In developing the MKE 600, we paid particular attention to achieving a high level of directivity and a balanced sound.”

Top-quality sound for successful videos
The shotgun microphone offers a very lifelike, full-bodied sound with good bass reproduction, while ensuring pleasant speech reproduction with high intelligibility. Thanks to its high level of directivity, the MKE 600 will pick up sound from the camera direction while avoiding unwanted background noise – making sure that the sound is always right next to the image. Handling and wind noise is significantly reduced by a switchable low-cut filter.

Independent of phantom powering
As not all video cameras provide phantom power for a microphone, phantom power for the MKE 600 can also be supplied by a standard AA battery. A switch is provided to deactivate the battery power when the camera is not in use, thus preventing the battery from being discharged. An LED on the battery switch (“Low Batt”) indicates when the battery voltage is low, after which there is still a reserve of around eight hours – plenty of time to complete a video even if you do not have a new battery readily available.

Professional accessories
The MKE 600 comes fully equipped with a foam windshield that reduces wind noise by around 25 dB. Also included is a carrying case and an elastic shock mount with an integral flashmount adapter for fixing the sturdy MKE 600 to the video camera. The special design of the shock mount prevents handling noise from being transmitted to the microphone.

For outdoor videos, a ‘blimp’ (MZH 600) – a combined foam/hairy cover windshield – which reduces wind noise more effectively than a foam windshield – is available as an optional accessory. A further option is a coiled connecting cable (KA 600) from an XLR-3 connector to a 3.5 mm jack plug.

The MKE 600 will be available at B&H Photo / Video beginning in late September.

Sennheiser Announces Broadcast Microphone Promotion for Customers Purchasing MKH 416 or ME66/K6 Combo

Audio specialist Sennheiser announced a new ‘election’ rebate promotion featuring its MKH 416 and ME66 shotgun microphones. Between September 1st and October 31st of 2012, customers who purchase a Sennheiser MKH 416 or ME 66/K6 microphone combo will be eligible to receive a Sennheiser HD 428 S portable, over the ear headphone free of charge.

This mail-in rebate promotion gives broadcast consumers a significant incentive to take advantage of the powerful sound, robust construction and ultra-reliable performance that Sennheiser shotgun microphones offer.

The Sennheiser MKH 416 shotgun interference tube microphone is one of Sennheiser’s most successful shotgun microphones. Its excellent directivity and compact design, high consonant articulation and feedback rejection make it an excellent choice for film, radio and television, and especially outdoor broadcast applications.

The ME 66, meanwhile, is a shotgun microphone designed for use with the K6 and K6P powering modules. It is especially suitable for reporting, film and broadcast location applications and for picking up quiet signals in noisy or acoustically live environments.

The HD 428 S are closed back, over the ear headphones that feature dynamic bass and high passive noise attenuation. They feature a crosshair design and rubber finishing on the earcups and high-output neodynium magnets for powerful stereo sound.

To learn more about the promotion, please visit http://www.sennheiserusa.com/electionrebate

Photo caption:
Sennheiser MKH 416 shotgun microphone.

Moog Music Sponsors This Weekend’s Hopscotch Music Festival

Moog Music has announced it will be sponsoring this weekend’s Hopscotch Music Festival, which showcases some of North Carolina’s finest musicians while pairing them with notable national and international artists. Slated to bring over 10,000 attendees to downtown Raleigh, Hopscotch is the second biggest new music festival in North Carolina after Moog’s own festival, Moogfest.

“Hopscotch is doing great things for music lovers in our state by bringing boundary pushing artists to North Carolina and putting local bands on a larger platform. Moog has always supported musicians that aren’t afraid to take risks and we’re honored to support festivals like Hopscotch that showcase these artists. It’s a great time to be a music fan in North Carolina with Hopscotch and Moogfest happening almost back to back on the calendar,” said Emmy Parker, Moog Sr. Marketing and Brand Manager.
 
Moog’s Hopscotch stage at the Hive @ Busy Bee Café, will feature some of North Carolina’s most experimental genre bending musicians, including: Found sound sculptor, Feltbattery; avant-garde jazz trio, The Hot at Nights; DJ’s for change, Beat Report; heart breaking fuzz-folk outfit, The Toddlers; and experimental-electro-metal duo Tomas Phillips and Craig Hilton.
 
Festival goers will also get a treat when DJ, Producer, and founder of Fool’s Gold records, Nick Catchdubs, hits the Moog stage. Fool’s Gold has signed and supported some of the most influential and experimental hip-hop and electronic artists of the last three years, including Moogfest alumni, Chromeo. 
 
To show its support for music fans in its home state of North Carolina, Moog will be welcoming each Hopscotch ticket holder at Wrist Band City in Downtown Raleigh’s Sheraton Hotel with giveaways, a daily raffle of their handcrafted effects pedals and the chance to play Moog’s iconic analog synthesizers.

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K-array and Hip Hop Legend Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC Help Inspire Underprivileged Children through New York Foundling’s Camp Felix

On Thursday, August 16th, children enrolled at Camp Felix participated in an exhuberant talent show, capping a two-week camp of activities that included arts and crafts, music, creative writing, drama and several workshops. Camp Felix, which is hosted each year by The New York Foundling — a prominent family services organization specializing in child welfare — is an overnight summer camp located in Putnam Valley, NY that features a variety of educational events and activities abandoned and underprivileged children.

Thursday evening’s talent show included a wide range of performances from children aged 8 to 13 such as synchronized Spanish dance routines, singer/songwriter performances and several vocal acts. The performances, which were broadcast to an audience of approximately 200 attendees through a pair of K-array KR 200 loudspeakers, also featured a performance of “Walk This Way” by Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC to cap off the evening.

Perhaps the highlight of the evening was when McDaniels gave a heartfelt message of hope to the children, stressing that they can overcome challenges and achieve whatever they want to in life. The New York Foundling, which helps over 13,000 people each year and whose guiding principle is ‘abandon no one,’ strengthens families and communities by helping each individual reach his or her potential. 

McDaniels was enthusiastic about the sound of the K-array loudspeakers and Sennheiser’s overall participation in the event: “Sennheiser had the K-array speakers at Camp Felix for the kids’ talent show and it was amazing,” he said. “People out in the parking lot wanted to know who was sounding so good at ‘the concert.’ And it was only two speakers!”

Ben Escobedo, RF services & field support engineer, technical services, Sennheiser, was on hand to set up and provide mixing services for the event: “This camp was for a great cause, and the K-array’s were just fantastic,” he said. “For an outdoor venue such as this, I needed something that was portable and could fit in my car, but that was powerful enough to provide great sound for the entire camp audience.”

Escobedo, who was able to get the system up and running in a matter of minutes due to its extreme portability, set up a simple mixer and connected Sennheiser microphones including an ew135 G3 wireless to provide flexibility on the stage, as well as e835, e935 and e965 wired microphones.

Photo captions:
1. Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC communicates a message of inspiration to children attending Camp Felix.
2. Performances at Camp Felix included Spanish dance routines; K-array KR 200s are visible at the left side of the photo.

St. Michael’s Church in New York City Discovers New Clarity in Music and Spoken Word with Recent K-array Loudspeaker Installation

Churches can provide an inspirational and pleasing atmosphere for congregants to enjoy both music and sermon messages. But frequently, challenging acoustic environments and highly reflective interior spaces can make creating a quality listening experience an enormous challenge. Recently, St. Michael’s Church in New York City upgraded its audio system for masses and services and chose Sennheiser-distributed K-array loudspeakers — not only for their unmatched audio quality, but also for their ability to blend into the existing aesthetics of the church.

The St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, which is located on the upper West Side of Manhattan, has been a mainstay for parishioners since its construction was completed in 1807. Its reverberant space makes it ideal for music performances, but the existing loudspeaker system that was in place more than 25 years was simply not up to the task of accurately reproducing both spoken word and live music performances with the quality and intelligibility that was required.

Once St. Michael’s made the decision to upgrade, authorized Sennheiser dealer PanAVid recommended installing K-array speakers and amplifiers to increase both sonic integrity and intelligibility, thereby improving the overall worship experience for congregants.

“The church’s reverberation makes it difficult to produce spoken word sound that is clear to all members of the congregation, but the K-array speakers and amplifiers provided crystal clear sound that has solved the problem,” said Robert Loehr, vice president of operations at PanAVid.

PanAVid installed two K-array KK 100 loudspeakers for the main system, two KKS 50s for the main sub-woofer system, and a total of six KK 50s as delay support speakers: two in the balconies and the other four spread throughout the sanctuary, all controlled by a programmable Roland digital mixing console.

“Although the church is beautiful in its classic design, this provides a unique acoustic challenge making it difficult for many of our congregation to hear the services,” said John Edward Cantrell, St. Michael’s Church’s choirmaster, organist and chief audio engineer. “K-array speakers and amplifiers helped us take advantage of the high frequencies the room favors, while boosting the overall quality of our spoken word services.”

The combination of the KK 50, KK 100 and KKS 50 made it possible for PanAVid to design a system that would meet the needs of St. Michael’s Church. The KK 50 and KK 100 speakers are compact line array elements comprised of multiple 2” neodymium transducers in a strong stainless steel chassis — each casting a wide dispersion pattern that can be configured horizontally or vertically. The KKS50 is a compact line array bass system comprised of 4 x 4” neodymium transducers housed in a stainless steel chassis that can also be configured horizontally or vertically.

The interior of St. Michael’s Church, which has a reverb time of approximately 3.5 seconds, has been particularly challenging for spoken word messages to be heard loud and clear. But Cantrell says the new K-array-based system generates a pleasing, crystal clear sound that provides clarity throughout the entire church.

With the new K-array installation now complete, Cantrell is able to spend more time creating inspirational music by playing the organ and leading the choir rather than at the mixing console grappling with interior acoustics and audio intelligibility.

Photo captions:
1. During a recent audio upgrade at St. Michael’s Church in New York, K-array speakers were chosen not only for their sound quality but also to match the aesthetics of the interior.

2. In the recent St. Michael’s audio upgrade, six K-array KK 50s were installed as delay support speakers.

3. View of the St. Michael’s sanctuary.

Sennheiser Unveils Premium Headsets Optimized for Microsoft Lync, Enabling Increased Quality in Unified Communications Deployments

Audio specialist Sennheiser announced the launch of two headset lines optimized for Microsoft Lync. The Circle Series wired headsets and the DW Series wireless headsets have been optimized for Microsoft Lync to enhance productivity in busy working environments. The new headsets help enable organizations leverage productivity advantages of a unified communications environment while providing comfort, voice clarity and premium sound quality for users.

Circle Series
The Circle Series includes two Microsoft Lync-compatible models: the dual-sided SC 260 ML and the single-sided SC 230 ML. Each is designed to deliver HD voice clarity sound and comfort to busy contact center, office and Unified Communication professionals. “In increasingly busy workplaces, smart communication tools that allow users to work more efficiently can give a competitive advantage. With Sennheiser’s launch of its new wired Circle Series headsets optimized for Microsoft Lync, we can help provide our mutual customers with an even wider choice of Unified Communications tools to improve their business productivity,” says Giovanni Mezgec, General Manager Lync Marketing at Microsoft Corp.

DW Series
The DW Series DECT wireless headsets includes three Microsoft Lync-compatible models: the 2-in-1 DW Office ML with headband and ear hook, the DW Pro1 ML single-sided headset and the DW Pro2 ML double-sided headset. “The DW Series of headsets optimized for Microsoft Lync leverages Sennheiser’s expertise in sound quality, noise cancelation and wireless audio transmission,” said Tori Seliokas, channel manager for telecommunications at Sennheiser’s U.S. headquarters. “The DW Series features an intelligent design, intuitive pairing options and a generous wireless range of approximately 180 feet within a typical office building. These features, especially when combined with Microsoft Lync optimization, can be a very powerful unified communications tool in just about any workplace.”

“Sennheiser is very pleased to be extending our portfolio with these five new wired and wireless products, each of which are now optimized for Microsoft Lync,” Seliokas concluded. “With our leadership in sound quality, comfort and hearing protection, contact center, office and Unified Communication professionals can enjoy an enriched communications experience.”

Photo captions:
Sennheiser’s Circle and DW Series headsets are now optimized for Microsoft Lync.

Neumann KH 120 Monitors Maintain Sonic Consistency in WWE’s Challenging Multiple-Medium Post-Production Environment

The production standard is set extremely high for post-production engineers at WWE (World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc.), a global entertainment company headquartered in Stamford, Conn. that reaches over 13 million viewers in the U.S. and broadcasts to more than 145 countries in 30 languages. Recently, WWE installed several pairs of Neumann KH 120s in its editing and post-production suites, which are used to monitor its weekly television, web and live auditorium programming.

The Neumann KH 120 was chosen for its versatility and its ability to deliver consistent sound quality across multiple broadcast mediums. Post-production staff at WWE relies on monitors in their non-linear video editing suites to produce audio that will provide viewers with the best possible listening experience on television, online and in arenas.

WWE produces seven hours of domestic television and another 80 hours of international content every week of the year, in addition to two home video titles and a pay-per-view event each month. When it came time to upgrade the video editing suites in WWE headquarters, the production team spent 18 months investigating options to get audio quality that sounded like “real speakers,” said Chris Argento, vice president of post-production at WWE.

“I fell in love with the audio quality of the small, self-powered Neumann KH 120 monitors,” Argentino says. “The stereo imaging and center channel information are absolutely perfect, and it’s incredible how accurate they are. There’s no artificial high end or feeling of processing. They sound like ‘real speakers’ and enable us to develop programming where we can judge the sound for television, online and the arena.”

Argento tested a variety of monitors while upgrading WWE’s Audio Mixing suites. For large suites, he selected Neumann’s new O 410 active midfield studio monitors. Having been extremely pleased with the crisp sound of the O 410s, Argento turned again to Neumann for the smaller non-linear video editing suites, which he chose to outfit with KH 120 monitors after getting firsthand experience with them during the 2011 NAB Show in Las Vegas.

WWE initially deployed pairs of KH 120 monitors in six non-linear editing suites, and subsequently added pairs to 14 additional suites. Now that the Neumann KH 120 has become the standard for WWE monitoring environments, Argento says he plans to add even more pairs of KH 120 monitors to additional editing suites in the near future.

Following its mantra of “good video is made by good audio,” WWE engineers are faced with a daily challenge of providing a consistent quality across existing and future media. Argento says the Neumann KH 120 monitors have made it easy to achieve this consistency, while maintaining the company’s high standards of audio quality.

The monitors have also aided editing and production staff in finishing programs that must forego audio post-production. Argento said it is critical post-production engineers are able get the same listening experience viewers will have later, and in this regard, he says the KH 120s have exceeded expectations.

As the first of Neumann’s line of studio monitors, the KH 120 is designed for use as a near-field loudspeaker or as a rear loudspeaker in larger multi-channel systems. It represents the latest in acoustic and electronic simulation and measurement technologies to ensure the most accurate sound reproduction possible.

Antelope Audio Eclipse 384 AD/DA Converter Brings Master-Quality Audio to Korn Frontman Jonathan Davis’ Road Rig

Korn shook up the rock world at the end of 2011 when the L.A.-based band released its tenth studio album, “Path of Totality,” featuring collaborations with a host of dubstep producers including multiple Grammy Award-winner Skrillex. Now, Korn frontman Jonathan Davis is doubling down on his recent statement that “North American dubstep is the new electronic heavy metal” through a side project, Killbot, and a solo project under his DJ name, J Devil, recording into a laptop on the road and in the studio, using Antelope Audio’s new Eclipse 384 converter, master clock and monitor controller.

Davis recently added the Eclipse 384 AD/DA converter in order to streamline his mobile production rig after spotting it on the Antelope Audio web site. The 384 kHz A-to-D/D-to-A converter is clocked using the same Oven Controlled Clock and 64-bit Acoustically Focused Clocking technology that is implemented in Antelope Audio’s renowned Trinity Master Clock. The Eclipse 384 offers additional features conducive to mobile production applications, including two dedicated headphone amplifiers and a custom USB interface, as well as two large peak meters on the front panel. In order to simplify operation, users can create up to five custom presets of favorite setups via the system’s OS X- and Windows-compatible software control panel that may then be recalled from the Eclipse 384’s front panel.

“This is all I’ve got now; I used to have racks of stuff,” says Davis, who records vocals, guitar and bass into an Apple MacBook Pro through a signal chain comprising little more than the Antelope Eclipse 384, an API Channel Strip and a Shure microphone. “It’s basically my studio all in one box. It’s the best interface I’ve used. I love that everything is right there,” he says of the Eclipse.

Davis, who has been performing DJ sets using the moniker J Devil, is a longtime aficionado of electronic dance music (EDM), and has been producing dubstep-influenced remixes for rock and electronic artists for several years. Having started creating EDM on his laptop “for fun,” Davis has now teamed up with dubstep producers and fellow metal-heads Sluggo and Tyler Blue to form Killbot, a “metalstep” collaboration that has signed to Steve Aoki’s Dim Mak dance record label and has announced plans to release a four-track EP. There is also a J Devil solo EP in the works.

Davis has jumped into EDM production with both feet, making use of every waking minute to create new music for all of his projects. “Making electronic music and learning to produce and learning my new instrument—laptop, I call it—has been an amazing thing,” he told Billboard.com recently. “After every Korn show I come offstage, take a shower and I start writing.”

By utilizing high-grade audio production equipment such as the Antelope Eclipse 384, Davis is able to produce release-ready masters right there on the tour bus or the hotel room. “The Eclipse is essential, because it gives me everything I need to work on the road and not just make a demo. The stuff I actually do on the road I keep and it sounds great—it’s not just a demo that I have to rework or re-record later,” he says.

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