Archive by Hummingbird Media

Sennheiser Appoints Alexander Schek Vice President Sales, Latin America

Old Lyme, CT – May 2, 2012: Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that Alexander Schek has been promoted to vice president sales, Latin America, effective immediately. In his new position, Schek will be responsible for Sennheiser’s sales strategy across each of its business lines, as well as managing the company’s area sales managers within the Latin American region. He will report directly to Markus Warlitz, general manager, Latin America.

Schek began his career with Sennheiser in 2009 as area sales manager for Central America and the Caribbean, where he was responsible for managing Sennheiser’s business across each of its divisions. In this role, he was very successful in increasing the overall distribution of Sennheiser products across Central America. As Vice President Sales, Latin America, Schek replaces Oliver Baumann who left Sennheiser in March.

“As one of the fastest growing economies in the world, the Latin American region represents a very important part of Sennheiser’s international growth strategy,” commented Markus Warlitz. “During his tenure at Sennheiser, Alexander has achieved remarkable sales performance while also possessing drive to take our business to the next level in Latin America. I congratulate him on this well deserved promotion.”

A German citizen who grew up in Brazil and Chile, Schek has an acute understanding of the Latin American market and business culture in addition to over a decade of executive level sales experience in the Consumer Electronics and Audio Industry. He holds a degree in Marketing from the University de las Américas, Santiago de Chile. Alexander is located in Miami, FL and will travel to the Latin American region on a frequent basis.

SmithsonMartin Inc. Announces New Retail Pricing Structure for Entire Product Line, Including Emulator, Kontrol Surface 1974

TORONTO, 26 April 2012— SmithsonMartin Inc., the company that brought musicians and producers Emulator and which released the Kontrol Surface 1974 last December, announced significant price reductions to its entire product line. Effective immediately, retailers can now access the Emulator, Kontrol Surface 1974 and a range of accessories at a fraction of the previous cost. Among the most notable price reductions is the Emulator Lifetime License, which last month was reduced from $499 to $99.

The price reductions, which have been made possible as a result of SmithsonMartin’s increased purchasing leverage and the elimination of its two-tier distribution model, represents an outstanding opportunity for retailers to capture additional margin on the most innovative DJ and MIDI control products currently available on the market.

New Opportunities for Retailers
Now that SmithsonMartin has extended its market recognition well beyond the DJ market into areas such as lighting, broadcast, houses of worship and other areas, our company has significantly increased its purchasing power,” observes CEO Alan Smithson. “This has in turn enabled us to reward our network of international resellers with greater pricing flexibility — and the opportunity to earn very generous margins on if they choose to stock our products.” Following is a summary of new prices for SmithsonMartin’s product line (effective April 1, 2012):

By selling its products direct to retailers and bypassing traditional distribution, SmithsonMartin is able to offer its retailer partners who keep stock attractive sales margins, while offering generously increased margins for its entire retailer base. The company will also continue to offer products through its state of the art eCommerce site, which provides outstanding product support and shipping / logistics capabilities. SmithsonMartin has also become a vendor through www.XchangeMarket.com, a new service that allows retailers to sell software without carrying stock. “Resellers are moving more towards an on-demand purchasing model and XchangeMarket is the ultimate in instant delivery of software serial codes for our customers. Guitar Center has lead the way by adopting this technology early, thus making it the industry standard for software sales moving forward.” Commented Mr. Smithson.

The MIDI software of choice for a broad range of professionals
Recently, SmithsonMartin has significantly extended its user base as its Emulator multi-touch MIDI control software has become the go-to software for lighting designers, video artists, clubs, broadcast professionals and houses of worship. This month, SmithsonMartin will release its Emulator Modular 1.2, which ships with a range of specialized buttons, knobs and sliders, while offering bi-directional MIDI support for the most widely used software platforms.

For a full description of the new pricing, including accessories, please visit www.SmithsonMartin.com or contact Julie Smithson at 1-416-219-8749 or Julie@smithsonmartin.com

Caption:
Kontrol Surface 1974 controlling GrandMA 2 software to light Skrillex at Ultrafest 2012.

Digg Syndication Del.icio.us Syndication Google Syndication MyYahoo Syndication Reddit Syndication

No Comments

Email This Post Email This Post

Related Topics: Automation |

NAB Show Presents Sennheiser with ACE Award, Recognizing Excellence in Booth Design and Execution

Las Vegas–April 19, 2012 – Audio specialist Sennheiser [booth C2632] was presented with an ACE (Awesome Cool Exhibit) Award by the NAB Show on Wednesday during a special ceremony. The peer-driven award recognizes NAB Show exhibitors for innovations in booth design and execution. Sennheiser captured the ‘medium sized’ booth category, which is defined as being between 200 and 900 square feet.

The judging criteria for the NAB’s ACE Awards are as follows:

Creativity: use of color, sound, light and other creative elements
Effectiveness: how well the booth draws in and engages the visitor
Overall structure: quality of the build and innovative use of materials
Peer review: overall “look and feel” as judged by other exhibitors

The NAB Show booth design is based on Sennheiser’s new global booth concept that was debuted at the CES and NAMM shows earlier this year and providesa tangible experience of the audio specialist’s brand values, inviting exploration and interaction. The interior space presents Sennheiser’s products in a series of ‘focused islands,’ each concentrating on a particular theme and providing visitors with a ‘hands-on’ experience. A sophisticated lighting concept spotlights each product and optimizes visibility.

This new booth design is yet another milestone in the audio specialist’s premium brand strategy. The design concept, developed by the German design agency Syndicate, was first brought to life two years ago in Sennheiser’s point of purchase program that was executed worldwide. Sennheiser is now consolidating the presentation of its brand profile at shows and trade fairs throughout the world.

“Our team is very proud to have been recognized by the NAB with the ACE Award,” commented Greg Beebe, President of Sennheiser USA. “Our U.S. team was the first to execute this important global concept from Sennheiser, and we have received a great deal of positive feedback from booth attendees — both during NAB Show and at other important U.S. trade shows.”

Over the coming year, the new concept will be used at all Sennheiser leading shows and trade fairs in the Consumer Electronics, Installed Sound and Professional Systems markets.

Antelope Audio to Unveil Rubicon – World’s First Atomic AD-DA Preamp

Santa Monica, CA, April 19, 2012– Antelope Audio will introduce Rubicon, a groundbreaking 384 kHz digital audio preamplifier which integrates the world renowned 10M Rubidium atomic clock. Rubicon caters to the ever-increasing interest in high-resolution audio, addressing the specific needs of high-end consumer electronics enthusiasts for accurate audio representation and detailed soundstage of both analog and digital recordings. The new device will be presented to the public during the Munich High End Show, May 3rd – 6th.

Rubicon is the first DAC to integrate a Rubidium atomic clock, which is 100,000 times more stable than a traditional crystal oscillator. Coupled with Antelope’s 64-bit Acoustically Focused Clocking technology, the Rubidium achieves a breakthrough in jitter management, improving the sound quality in an unprecedented way. The same technology is implemented in the company’s flagship master clocks used for scoring blockbusters such as Avatar and available at the best recording and mastering studios around the Globe.

“I find the idea of an audio enthusiast being able to hear his/her favorite recordings clocked by the world’s most stable clock very exciting. I believe this will bring the music appreciation in the home environment to a completely new level compared only to the precision and sonic detail representation available at the finest professional listening rooms,” shared Igor Levin, CEO and founder of Antelope Audio.

Housed in a sturdy, machined-aluminum enclosure with a vintage Art Deco design, Rubicon incorporates a discrete phono preamp, ultra linear, dual stage headphone drivers and Antelope’s renowned gold-plated relay volume control.

The transformer-based, ultra-low noise, discrete JFET phono preamp is a complement that will be highly appreciated by many vinyl lovers. In addition to the 384 kHz DAC, Rubicon also includes ultra-high sample rate A/D conversion. These functionalities together with the high resolution USB recording capability provide the users with the sublime experience of digitizing their favorite tracks, still keeping the depth and the warmth of the original analog recordings.

In addition to the 384 kHz USB streaming, Rubicon offers extended flexibility and smooth user experience provided by the implemented DLNA capability. The DLNA streaming gives users the opportunity to wirelessly push audio files from their smart phone, PC or NAS (Network-attached storage) server and play the content through the high-sample rate DAC.

Rubicon inherits the D/A conversion technology from 384 kHz Zodiac Gold DAC – the 2012 winner of the Audio Excellence Award in Japan and often described by reviewers and prominent sound engineers as “future-proofed”, “clean”, “neutral” and “accurate”. The A/D circuit comes from the 2011 winner of the Audio Media Gear of the Year award, high-end professional mastering converter Eclipse 384.

Antelope Audio plans to present the Rubicon for the first time to the public and the media during the Munich High End Show, in hall 3, booth A 04, at 2 pm, on May 3rd.

Rubicon features

– 10M Rubidium Atomic Clock, providing 100,000 times more accurate reference;
– 64-bit Acoustically Focused Clocking jitter management technology;
– Ultra low noise phono inputs with custom audio transformers, discrete JFET preamp design;
– 384kHz A/D & D/A converters;
– Gold-plated stepped relay volume attenuator matched to 0.05dB for all volume levels;
– Ultra-linear, dual stage headphone amps;
– De-jittered audio S/PDIF output;
– Custom USB 2.0 chip streaming up to 480 Mbits/384kHz with recording option;
– DLNA streaming capabilities through an Ethernet interface

Specifiations:
Analog Inputs
1x PHONO Input on RCA
3x Inputs on RCA
1x HiZ Input on RCA
1x Combo Balanced Input on XLR/¼ TRS

Analog Outputs
1x Balanced Output on XLR
1x Unbalanced Output on RCA

Digital Inputs
2x S/PDIF
2x TOSLINK
1x AES/EBU
Word Clock Input
Ethernet port

Digital Outputs
2x S/PDIF De-jittered outputs

Elevation Church Embraces Recent Sennheiser Endorsement, while Putting New Neumann KK 205 Microphone Capsules to the Test

Charlotte, NC – April 18, 2012: Recognized by Outreach Magazine as one of the fastest-growing churches in the United States, Elevation Church serves over 10,000 congregants each weekend and maintains six worship campuses — four of which are ‘portable.’ To keep pace with this growth, Elevation has had to establish itself on a solid technology footing and has maintained a strong relationship with Sennheiser since opening its doors in 2005. Recently, Elevation became an official Sennheiser endorsed worship facility and was among the first to put the new Neumann KK 205 capsules — which are designed for the Sennheiser 2000 series wireless transmitters — through their paces.

Brian Poole is technical director at Elevation Church and has worked closely with Sennheiser to ensure that the clarity and sonic integrity of the facility is all that it can be, no matter which campus congregants are attending. Recently, Elevation added five Neumann KK 205 microphone capsules to its arsenal of live performance and recording tools. Poole discusses how he has helped Elevation continue to deliver superior sound with Sennheiser and Neumann.

Can you describe some of the challenges that go along with the growth that Elevation has experienced?
We are six years old and have six campuses in the Charlotte area. All in all, we are running at about 10 or 11 thousand people every weekend. With that growth, there have been a lot of rapid changes we have had to make, especially considering that audio is a very big part of what we do. Sennheiser has been there for us the entire time and has provided the best product and support we could ask for — and even more so now that we are endorsed. A big challenge as a multi-campus church is ensuring that we will have gear that we know will be reliable and sound great. Four of our campuses are portable, so we are lugging gear in and out all weekend; when we plug it all in and turn it on, we know it is going to work. Sennheiser has also helped us through our RF coordination, which can be very complex.

How familiar are you with Neumann microphone capsules?
We have always loved Neumann microphones and already had the KK 105 capsules on our pastor’s [Steven Furtick] speaking mic with a Sennheiser SKM 5200 transmitter. Our pastor does a lot of singing as well, and the performance of the SKM 5200 / KK 105 combination has been fantastic. By making a Neumann capsule that works with an SKM 2000 transmitter is really a game changer for us. Now we can have Neumann sound not only for the pastor, but all our other lead singers and it is a very economical solution.

Tell me about your first impressions with the KK 205s.
We just received them three weeks ago, and they are already on our primary lead vocal microphones [used in combination with the Sennheiser SKM 2000 handheld transmitters] at our two permanent campuses. One of these campuses is a warehouse with low ceilings, and the acoustics aren’t ideal. The KK 205 has a supercardioid pattern so we are able to get plenty of gain before feedback — this is huge for us because we like it loud and we like it to sound good. I was 100 percent comfortable that I could take the KK 205 right to the stage without going through weeks of rehearsals first.

For our Easter service, the new Neumann capsules went into our broadcast facility. We have a big spoken word element in our Easter service, and this is the first thing right out of the gate during our worship experience. All our main worship leaders were on the KK 205s and the feed went out to all six of our campuses. It was also put online for everyone to see and participate in. Everything worked out great and all the voices were very rich.

Do you intend to use the KK 205s in other applications?
We do a lot of recording both for CDs and streaming on our website. In fact, our worship band has just signed a pretty big record deal and we expect the KK 205s and the SKM 2000s will be used on future live recordings. Our first live album and live DVD was a big deal for us and it is very exciting that Sennheiser has released a ‘Neumann for the Masses,’ if you will.

How has your experience been with Sennheiser overall, including with the new Neumann KK 205s?
First of all, Sennheiser has rock solid RF and the sound quality is best of the best. We’ve got 36 channels in our auditorium of Sennheiser wireless and I’ve never had a single issue of anything dropping out. Now, with the KK 205s, we can put Neumann performance in the reach of all our singers, increasing the overall quality of our worship experience. Audio quality has always been an incredibly important component of worship for Elevation Church and the KK 205 capsules truly represent quality for the masses — the cost/performance ratio cannot be beat. All in all, our relationship with Sennheiser has been fantastic and we feel very blessed.

Caption:
Brad Hudson, Worship Leader at Elevation Church, uses a KK 205 on a SKM 2000 during Easter rehearsals at Elevation’s Blakeney campus.

Neumann Introduces KK 204 and KK 205 Microphone Capsules, Designed to Complement Sennheiser’s 2000 Series Wireless Handheld Transmitter

Old Lyme, Conn. – April 16, 2012: Premium audio brand Neumann announced that it will be showcasing its new KK 204 and KK 205 microphone capsules at the Sennheiser booth [C2632] during NAB 2012. The new capsules, which are available in cardioid (KK 204) and supercardioid (KK 205) patterns, are compatible with Sennheiser’s 2000 series of wireless handheld transmitters.

The acoustic features of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads are derived from the multiple award-winning wired Neumann stage microphones, the KMS 104 and KMS 105. The KK 204, with its cardioid pattern, ensures the best possible suppression of sound originating from 180 degrees to the rear, while the supercardioid KK 205 has greater directivity, and maximizes incident sound from the front as compared to sound from the rear. Due to the “single polar pattern design,” the polar patterns are very uniform over the entire frequency range and provide excellent resistance to feedback.

Wolfgang Fraissinet, President of Neumann, commented: “Neumann capsules have already been used in combination with the Sennheiser SKM 5200 handheld transmitter for the past 10 years on some of the largest stages of the world, where the highest demands are placed on a high-resolution sound and transmission reliability. With the development of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads, the Neumann sound is now also available for the Sennheiser 2000 Series. The synergies between the key areas of expertise of Sennheiser handheld transmitters and Neumann capsule sound permit us to offer our customers a wireless system of absolutely uncompromisingly quality, even for the most demanding live applications.”

In developing the new capsules, particular importance was placed on the effective damping of pop sounds and handling noise, as well as on the extremely low level of self-noise. The KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads also have an extremely wide dynamic range and were designed to be very easy to service.

The aesthetic design complements the construction of the SKM 2000 handheld transmitter, and each capsule — like the SKM 2000 transmitter — is available in both nickel and black finishes. Each capsule includes a large nylon bag designed to hold the capsules, the handheld transmitter, battery packs and additional accessories.

    Both the KK 204 and KK 205 feature:

Reduced handling noise: Very low sensitivity to handling noise with a steep roll-off from approximately 78 Hz
Reduced plosives and sibilance: Both capsules feature a foam-lined grille to ensure smooth sound
Wide dynamic range with high SPL capability: 126 dB-A of dynamic range with 150 dB MAX SPL
Low feedback: Incredibly smooth and flat frequency response provided high gain before feedback
Easy to service components: Neumann understands the rigors of the road and has made the KK 204 and KK 205 exceptionally robust but easy to service if necessary

    Specifications:

Directional pattern: Cardioid (KK 204) / Super-cardioid (KK 205)
Frequency range: 40 Hz – 20 kHz
Sensitivity (at 1 kHz into 1 k?): 2.8 mV/Pa ± 1 dB
Equivalent noise level, CCIR1): 35 dB
Equivalent noise level, A-weighted1): 24 dB-A Max. SPL for 0.5% THD2) 150 dB
Dynamic range (A-weighted): >126 dB-A
Weight (including transmitter and power supply unit): Approx. 17.6 oz.
Dimensions (including SKM 2000)/length: 10.7 in., ø 2.2 in.

1) according to IEC 60268-1; CCIR-weighting according to CCIR 468-3, quasi peak; A-weighting according to IEC 61672-1, RMS
2) measured as equivalent el. input signal

Sennheiser adds the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter to its evolution wireless series

Old Lyme, Conn.–April 16, 2012– Audio specialist Sennheiser is extending its evolution wireless ew 300 G3 series with the addition of the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter. Whether it is for a speaker’s podium or for fast mobile use in video productions, the SKP 300 G3 converts any conventional cabled microphone quickly and easily into a wireless version. The phantom power required by condenser microphones is also supplied by the rugged transmitter – a highly versatile device that enables cabled microphones to become wireless with ease.

“With the new SKP 300 G3, we are further expanding the application possibilities for the evolution wireless series,” explained Robb Blumenreder, channel manager for professional systems products at Sennheiser’s U.S. headquarters. “The plug-on transmitter comes with its own phantom power supply, enabling it to be combined with any microphone with an XLR-3 output.”

For applications in the Installed Sound sector, the plug-on transmitter can be combined with an EM 300 G3 rack-mount receiver, thus making it possible, for example, to have a speaker’s podium without the visual interference of cables or to implement mobile lecterns. For video journalists, the SKP 300 G3 is an ideal partner for the EK 100 G3 camera receiver.

The SKP 300 is powered by two AA batteries or the optional BA 2015 accupack. The plug-on transmitter is available in eight frequency ranges, and is quickly and easily synchronized with its receiver using an infrared link.

The SKP 300 will be available in April 2012.

Caption:
SKP 300.jpg: Wireless with ease: the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter with switchable phantom power turns cabled microphones into wireless ones in next to no time

Technical Data: SKP 300

Modulation wideband FM
Frequency ranges A: 516–558 MHz; G: 566–608; GB: 606–648 MHz;
B: 626–668 MHz; C: 734–776 MHz; D: 780–822 MHz;
E: 823-865 MHz

Frequency banks 20 frequency banks each with up to 24
intermodulation-free presets; 6 frequency banks
with up to 24 frequencies freely selectable by the user
in 25 kHz steps
(Please note that the EK 100 G3 camera receiver has
only twelve frequencies per channel bank)

Switching bandwidth 42 MHz
RF output power 10/30 mW
Nominal/peak deviation ±24 kHz/±48 kHz
Phantom power 48 V ± 2 V
Compander system HDX
Audio frequency response 80–18,000 Hz
THD 0.9%
Signal-to-noise ratio > 120 dBA (1 mV peak deviation)
Audio input XLR-3F, balanced
Power supply 2 AA batteries (1.5 V) or BA 2015 accupack
Operating time typ. 8 hrs (30 mW RF power, without P48)
Dimensions 105 x 43 x 43 mm
Weight with batteries 195 g

NYCTaper, Archivist of New York’s Live Indie Music Scene Captures the Best of Austin’s Music Festival with Sennheiser

Austin – April 11, 2012: Since starting his NYCTaper website in the mid-nineties, Dan Lynch (a.k.a. NYCTaper) has been recording and streaming hundreds of recordings over the Internet, reflecting the best that New York City’s live indie scene has to offer. Lynch, who strives to make the listener feel like he or she ‘was actually there,’ is well known to indie music lovers in New York City and well beyond — his listening audience extends from not only major U.S. metro cities like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, but to more distant geographies such as Japan, Europe and the far reaches of Australia.

While his own backyard is New York City, NYCTaper decided to capture the best of what Austin had to offer during its famous music week last month — listen to some of the results here. Armed with a pair of Sennheiser MKH 8040 cardioid microphones, his HD 280 closed back headphones and a trusty Edirol digital four-track portable recorder, he became “AustinTaper” for a week and recorded some of the best live set lists south of the Mason Dixon line.

What did you record while in Austin?
I have a pretty good relationship with Brooklyn Vegan over the years and the list of bands they were hosting was impressive. So I set up at Hotel Vegan in the afternoons and at the Impose Magazine parties during the evenings and recorded everything I could. In terms of genre, I am particularly drawn to indie rock but I also like any artist that has talent, imagination and something a little different than all the other music out there. For me, it can’t be a formula or promoted by any particular product — I want to see original talent.

What are some of the challenges you encountered in Austin versus what you’re used to in New York City?
Well, there is obviously a lot of extraneous noise when you are recording outdoors. The Sennheiser MKH 8040s are cardioid microphones and this makes them perfectly suited for this kind of thing. Normally, you’d have wind noise to deal with, but this was not an issue since the 8040s have a cardioid pattern and also come with these gigantic windscreens, which are very useful. Wind noise aside, there is not much you can do about the typical chatter you hear during these outdoor type shows, as well as some of the extraneous noise coming through from neighboring stages, but the pattern on the 8040 helped minimize these issues as much as possible.

Did you get a chance to audition the 8040s before you left for Austin?

Yes. Just before I left, I did back-to-back shows in New York City: I recorded Sharon Van Etten at the Bowery Ballroom and Craig Finn from The Hold Steady at Mercury Lounge. I used only the two channels of 8040s in both of these rooms, which I happen know very well, and they worked great. A typical problem I get in some rooms are reflections you get from the ceiling — which sound very ‘claustrophobic.’ With the 8040s, it was the first time I heard my recordings without these annoying reflections. So I knew they would work perfectly well in Austin well before I left.

What was your specific set up during each performance?
I had two Sennheiser MKH 8040s mics set up about eight inches apart in a 110 degree pattern on a stand, which was approximately 8 feet high. In addition to the two live mics, I sourced the left and right main mix feeds via direct outputs from the board. My recorder is an Edirol R44 4-track recorder with modded preamps, and I was capturing 24-bit audio. I was monitoring the recordings through my Sennheiser HD 280s, which are closed back, over the ear headphones.

How did the MKH 8040s perform on the ground in Austin?
First off, there was absolutely no issue capturing the high sound pressure levels on these mics — they can handle anything you throw at them and I have experienced virtually zero distortion. I am getting an extremely clean signal, and in terms of frequency response, the MKH 8040 delivers a sweet and crisp lower end and the highs are very tight. In general, the frequency response was so good that I didn’t have to EQ at all. The mic had basically a zero signal to noise ratio and there was no handling noise or self noise. Ultimately, the combination of the 8040’s cardioid pattern and its ability to perform without any audible distortion makes it the right mic for this kind of festival recording.

Tell me about your monitoring setup while you’re in the field.
For what I’m doing, maintaining isolation is very important because there is just so much noise happening all over, and to that end, I just can’t say enough good things about the Sennheiser HD 280s. Using these headphones, it was the first time I’ve ever recorded a show where I could only hear what was coming through the mics and the board — you are literally inside the cans and I love that. This means I can focus much more, because now I can hear what I’m doing and adjust things like mic positions or levels. They are also fit just right over my ears — I recorded over 35 shows while in Austin and experienced no discomfort whatsoever.

Do you also use the HD 280s while editing and mixing?
Yes. When I am using the HD 280s in hotel room for editing and mixing after a show, I can hear everything. Maybe there is a kick or a snare drum that was a little hot — now I can pinpoint that and make adjustments if necessary. I also enjoy the experience of just listening to music I’ve recorded on the HD 280s while I’m relaxing. One of the nice things about being NYC Taper or AustinTaper is that eventually I get to go home and actually listen to all these recordings, just like the fans of my site.

Listen to some of NYCTaper’s Austin tracks here: http://www.sennheiserusa.com/nyctaper

Neumann KH 120 Monitors Provide Precision and Clarity for Mateusz Zechowski, Classical Recordist for Yale Symphony Orchestra

New Haven, Conn. – April 10, 2012 – Since 2000, Mateusz Zechowski’s STUDIOTEO has been providing freelance recording services to some of the most renowned orchestras, choirs and ensembles in the northeastern corridor. Based out of New Haven, Zechowski, who has just upgraded his monitoring system to include the Sennheiser-distributed Neumann KH 120s, has a versatile geographic reach working with clients in and around neighboring Yale University as well as New York City and Boston. He counts Yale Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra New England, New York Choral Society and Juilliard Baroque Ensemble among his clients.

“For classical recordists, there are generally two types of recordings,” says Zechowski. “One is taping concerts, in which you are more or less battling a recording environment that has already been chosen, and the other is ‘co-creating’ a recording with a client where you can exert more artistic control. Both scenarios — and in fact all the work I do — require top-notch studio monitors and now I am 100 percent dependent on the Neumann KH 120s.”

Zechowski is a native of Poland who studied at the Chopin Academy of Music in Warsaw and more recently at the Yale School of Music in New Haven. His recordings regularly appear on internationally regarded classical labels such as Naxos, Carus Verlag and Dels. The Neumann KH 120 active near field monitor is his monitor of choice whether he is on-location or working in his mastering suite in the lower level of his home. He was introduced to the KH 120 during the AES show in New York, when he met Sennheiser product specialist for studio products, Christopher Currier.

“I asked Christopher about the Neumann KH 120s at the booth, and he said he was happy to bring a pair by for me to demo in my studio,” Zechowski recalls. “When he did, I was in pretty deep shock because when compared to my other set — a respected large format British monitor — it was immediately apparent that the Neumann’s clarity, openness and large sound stage was far superior. My first impression was that they were on the bright side, but later I realized that this was due to its extended clarity.” The other thing that struck Zechowski was the amount of sheer bass force and dispersion in the low end: “It is quite incredible that such small monitors can generate such a large sound stage — especially in the lower frequencies. It is quite a remarkable achievement.”

Once Zechowski acquired the KH 120s and began using them on a regular basis on his work with choirs, small ensembles and large orchestras, the sonic attributes of the KH 120s became even more apparent: “These speakers are very precise, and this becomes very important when you have singing voices. With this kind of precision, you can hear and fix things immediately, whether it is a miking set up, EQ, or whatever. They give you an exact read.” The compact size and extreme portability of the KH 120s also enable Zechowski to bring them on location to his sessions. “They are a real winner for what I do and help me quickly assess what kind of mic set up I want to use, whether it is a Decca tree, a traditional spaced pair or a coincident mic arrangement.”

Zechowski now relies on the KH 120s to ensure his work sounds good outsideof the studio, as well. “All the mixes I do on the KH 120 translate beautifully to the external world, whether it is a mundane car stereo, a home-based system or audiophile setup alike,” he says.

As Zechowski continues his relentless pursuit to increase the quality of his recordings, the phone keeps on ringing: “In this profession, everything depends on word of mouth,” he observes. “Musicians relate to each other and recommend recording engineers like other people might recommend dentists. I’ve managed to build a steady group of loyal clients, because I am always looking to improve on what I’m doing.”

The Neumann KH 120 studio monitor
The Neumann KH 120 is a compact near-field studio monitor that delivers unprecedented accuracy and versatility within a broad range of monitoring environments. The KH 120 is perfect for tracking, mixing and mastering in music, broadcast, project and post-production studios.

The KH 120 represents the latest in acoustic and electronic simulation and measurement technologies to ensure the most accurate sound reproduction possible. It has a Mathematically Modeled Dispersion™ (MMD) waveguide, flexible acoustical controls, analog class-AB amplifiers, various input formats and an extensive mounting hardware range. All of this provides the user with the maximum versatility over a wide variety of acoustic conditions, source equipment and physical locations.

Sennheiser to Host Series of Online Recording Sound Academy (RSA) Webinars between April and October

Old Lyme, Conn. – April 2, 2012 –Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that it will begin hosting a series of online webinars featuring Grammy-award winning engineers and producers this week. The webinars will teach attendees how to use various recording techniques aimed at achieving the best possible studio sound.

The first webinar, which will focus on EQ and compression techniques, will held free of charge this Thursday April 5th at 5:00 p.m. EDT as a special introductory offering to program participants. To register for this Online RSA, or learn about other upcoming webinars that will be taking place, please visit http://www.sennheiserusa.com/RSA.

Topic/Host
Avoiding Too Much Equalization and Compression, hosted by David Thoener, Grammy-winning producer/engineer (Santana, AC/DC).

When:
Thursday, April 5th at 5:00 p.m. EDT

Attendees will learn:

– How to use EQ constructively
– When to use compression—and when not to
– How to add the final sheen to the mix with gentle use of EQ

Sennheiser: Supporting Aspiring Producers/Engineers
The Online Recording Sound Academy borrows instructional elements from Sennheiser’s highly successful on-site Recording Sound Academy seminars, such as valuable tips and instruction on microphone selection and placement, recording and mixing techniques. The RSA webinars — which run between April and October — feature instruction by accomplished producers and engineers on a variety of recording topics, and also feature a thorough Q&A session with the instructor. Following is a summary of upcoming dates and topics:

May 3: Modern Compression Tactics
Hosted by Karl Richardson, nine-time Grammy-award-winning producer

June 13: Recording Vocals
Hosted by Tom Young, Grammy award-winning engineer

July 17: Mixing
Hosted by Tim Palmer, Grammy-nominated producer/mixer

August 13: Re-Mixing, Beats and Percussive Rhythms
Hosted by: Cool & Dre, production/songwriting team

September 12: Reverb, Spectral Energy and Human Positional Perception
Hosted by: Greg Lukens, engineer and founder of Audio Fabricators

October 25: Engineer’s Roundtable: Award-winning Engineers Discuss Recording Tips, Tricks and Trends
Moderated by: Al Schmitt, 21-time Grammy-winning producer/engineer

About

The Radio magazine The Wire provides information from manufacturers and associations about industry news, products, technology and business announcements. The information shown here is posted by companies and their representatives and are not edited or previewed by the Radio magazine staff. The content providers are solely responsible for the content of their posts. If you would like your company's news and information to appear here, contact us.

Calendar

April 2014
S M T W T F S
« Mar    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Your Account

Subscribe

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Subscribe to MyYahoo News Feed

Subscribe to Bloglines

Google Syndication