Clear-Com Announces Seamless Roaming For Tempest2400 at the 2012 NAB Show

New Product Breakthrough Delivers Uninterrupted Coverage for Large-Scale Broadcasts

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 16, 2012 ? Clear-Com, a global leader in critical voice communication systems, today is pleased to unlock the Seamless Roaming capability for its Tempest2400 digital wireless intercom at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C8008). Further enhancing one of the most feature-rich and robust system within Clear-Com’s wireless product line, Tempest Seamless Roaming will be most applicable in large mixed facilities that are separated by sizeable distances such as campus buildings, multi-studio environments and/or outdoor venues.

“With Seamless Roaming, a Tempest2400 wireless BeltStation can cover an extensive area with multiple zones that would not be adequately supported by a single BaseStation installation,” says Craig Fredrickson, Clear-Com’s wireless product manager. “This allows broadcasters to focus on critical production cues rather than having to change the settings on their wireless BeltStations when moving within a venue.”

Tempest Seamless Roaming is meant for individuals on the production team who must move freely and wirelessly from a given coverage area to another without interference or dropout of intercom communication. Base stations are linked together with the newest ZSync (Zero Synchronization) Technology. The ZSync Technology provides a zero sync reference that coordinates the hopping patterns of all connected BaseStations every time the system is powered up, irrespective of random time variation in power up sequences, to provide improved system performance and a seamless wireless experience.

With the Seamless Roaming feature, BeltStation users can migrate between as many as 16 different Tempest2400 BaseStations (coverage areas or zones). Both Seamless Roaming and iSelect Roaming are available to accommodate virtually every application need.

The Tempest2400, designed with Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) technology, utilizes a narrow band signal that is continually changing frequencies to powerfully burn through RF noise and interference. Because of FHSS technology, the Tempest system does not compete with signals from other 2.4 GHz wireless devices, minimizing frequency coordination and enabling flawless performance. Moreover, the wireless system features state-of-the-art 2xTX Transmission Voice Data Redundancy, which sends each packet of audio data twice on different frequencies and through different antennas, ensuring uninterrupted audio communications. Via four- and two-wire connections, it can interoperate with other Clear-Com intercom systems, as well as those from other manufacturers.

Tempest2400 offers three different modes of operations—Normal, Shared and Split. All modes are supported under the Seamless Roaming function. A single Tempest2400 in Normal mode can support between one and five full-duplex wireless users who always need to speak on the intercom system. However, in Split or Shared mode, an unlimited number of users can monitor the conversation and share talk capability. A combination of Tempest systems operating in either Normal or Shared mode can co-exist in the same environment for the ultimate in flexibility. Each digital BeltStation offers four audio channels. By stacking up to 10 BaseStations together, 50 independent, full-duplex wireless BeltStations can operate together in a single system.

About Clear-Com
Clear-Com, an HME company, is a global provider in professional voice communications systems since 1968. We develop and market proven intercom technologies such as Analog & Digital Partyline, Digital Matrix, Wireless and Intercom-over-IP systems for critical communication applications in broadcast, performance venues, military, government and enterprise markets. Recognized for our legacy of intercom innovations, production teams around the world have come to depend on Clear-Com for clear, reliable and scalable communications solutions. For more information, please visit www.clearcom.com.

About HM Electronics, Inc. (HME)
HM Electronics, Inc. is a diverse group of companies providing solutions that enhance productivity and customer service in markets including restaurants, sports and professional audio. Founded in 1971, we sell, service and support products in 89 countries worldwide, via company-owned offices in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and China, and an extensive network of HME-authorized distributors, dealers and service agents. Every day quick service restaurants take over 24 million orders using HME systems. With the recent acquisition of Clear-Com, HME is the world’s leading provider of professional intercom systems. To learn more, visit www.hme.com.

SSL Introduces V5 Software for C100 HDS Digital Broadcast Console at the 2012 NAB Show

Upgrade Introduces Dual Operator Functionality

LAS VEGAS – Solid State Logic, the world’s leading manufacturer of advanced analogue and digital audio consoles, is pleased to announce V5 software for the C100 HDS Digital Broadcast Console at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C2013). This new software release will implement a range of features to enable Dual Operator Mode for SSL’s C100 HDS specialized broadcast console. While the development of V5 software responds to feedback from a wide range of SSL clients, the upgrade is particularly relevant to mobile installations where complex productions demand two operators but space and weight are at a premium.

“As the broadcast industry continues to encounter more complex production situations involving multiple mixes, our team has developed the V5 software enhancement for the C100 HDS to meet the needs of two mix engineers at the same time,” says Piers Plaskitt, CEO of SSL, Inc. “V5 allows our most powerful digital console to be installed in a space and weight conscious OB van, for example, to easily handle a live international sporting event presented in different languages, therefore requiring different simultaneous mixes. We believe the V5 software upgrade will further solidify the C100’s impact on the market.”

SSL’s Dual Operator Mode provides two operators the ability to have independent physical controls and access to shared audio assets, through a single console processing engine, Routing and I/O configuration. The system allows for an unlimited number of consecutive eight-channel fader bays to be assigned to a 2nd operator. These bays can be located at either end of a C100 console or separated and installed in a remote location such as a production gallery. The 2nd operator bays can be specified with a dedicated Master Tile to provide access to EQ, dynamics, aux sends and various routing functions, or specified without a Master Tile for simple fader-only operation.

Dual Operator Mode splits the C100 PFL system to provide independent PFL control for each operator with monitoring via headphones, or the main or mini monitor outputs. If both operators access the PFL system simultaneously and route to the monitor outputs, the PFL system delivers a sum of all selected channels. V5 also introduces a new momentary ‘non-latching’ PFL mode to facilitate shared use of monitor outputs.

Each operator will also have independent access to user layers to facilitate selection of individual channels to be laid out in each operator’s area and individual channels that are a shared resource, allowing simultaneous control from both operator areas. A fully redundant C100 system will see both Operator areas as a single console, delivering seamless redundancy for both users. For streamlined project recall for an entire Dual Operator system, all settings for both operators are also saved within a single project.

Solid State Logic is the world’s leading manufacturer of analogue and digital audio consoles and provider of creative tools for music, broadcast and post production professionals. For more information about our award-winning products, please visit: www.solidstatelogic.com.

John Buckman To Present 132nd AES Convention Keynote Address

Innovative Online Label Founder To Discuss Successful Indie Music Models

BUDAPEST: John Buckman, founder of several online music businesses including Berkeley, CA-based Magnatune, has been selected as Keynote speaker for the 132nd AES Convention. The event will be held April 26-29, at the Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center. Currently serving as Chairman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Buckman is an entrepreneur inspired by the causes of Internet freedom and free culture. He founded the online record label Magnatune in 2003 as a reaction to his experiences with the music industry. Magnatune strives to be fair both to recording artists and consumers alike and is considered a solid example of a successful “sharing economy” based business model.

Entitled “Small And Beautiful: Models for Successful Independent Music Businesses,” Buckman’s Keynote will address his experience in developing a successful online music business. Buckman’s egalitarian business practices are distinguished by non-exclusive agreements with musicians. His pioneering Fair Trade Music Philosophy is based on equally shared profits with his artists, and allowing them to retain full rights to their own music. Since founding Magnatune, Buckman has signed more than 250 recording artists across multiple genres including Classical, Electronica, World, Alt Rock, Jazz and Hard Rock. He is about to launch iLicenseMusic.com. In addition to such other internet music companies as MoodMixes.com (background music for restaurants) and ToneGnome.com (audio engineering services over the Internet), he has also had a successful career as an audio engineer.

Profiled by Inc. Magazine, The Economist, Forbes, and other major publications for his innovative approach to online music distribution, Buckman is also Founder and CEO of BookMooch, an innovative community for sharing over 1 million books each year in 91 countries via the Internet.

Highlighted by a diverse program of Papers, Workshops, Tutorials, Recording, Hearing, Broadcast, Game Audio, Student, Career, and Special Events, the 132nd AES Convention will epitomize the Audio Engineering Society mandate of providing a platform for listening, learning and connecting. Visit http://www.aes.org/events/132/calendar/calendar.cfm for a complete list of event titles, abstracts and presentation times.

Photo: John Buckman will present the Keynote address at the 132nd AES Convention in Budapest on April 26.

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The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. With over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East, the organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

Sound Devices Debuts PIX 260 Production Video Recorder at the 2012 NAB Show

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 16, 2012 — Sound Devices, experts in portable audio and video products for field production, introduces its new PIX 260 production audio/video recorder at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C2546). Based on Sound Devices’ field-proven PIX 220 and PIX 240 recorders, the rack-mounted PIX 260 is a file-based video/audio recorder/player that seamlessly replaces tape-based video decks in production and post-production environments.

Using the Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD codecs, the PIX 260 records and plays files up to 220 Mbps in high-quality 10-bit 4:2:2 video as well as 32 tracks of 48 kHz audio. Files from the PIX 260 are ready for direct import into Avid and Final Cut editing environments, eliminating time-consuming transferring and transcoding. Files can also play out of the PIX 260 for realtime applications.

Continuing the company’s deep heritage in production sound, Sound Devices has infused the PIX 260 with 32-track record/playback capability. In addition to 16 channels of embedded SDI audio and eight channels of HDMI audio, the PIX 260 also accepts eight channels of line-level analog I/O and eight channels of AES digital audio. Using Dante, the PIX 260 can accept and transmit up to 32 channels of audio over Ethernet.

The PIX 260 has a built-in five-inch 800 x 480-pixel video display that allows users to view video and setup-menu selections. With its extensive control capabilities, the PIX 260 is a flexible video playback source that is compatible with Final Cut Pro 7, Final Cut Pro X and Avid sessions. The PIX 260 can be controlled by both external RS-422 and via Ethernet through the embedded Web server, allowing for machine transport control over Ethernet-based networks.

Up to four SATA drives can be connected to the PIX 260 simultaneously. All four drives can be recorded to simultaneously, for RAID-1 type redundancy and to eliminate the need for post-record copying when multiple copies are required.

The PIX 260 includes a built-in Ambient Clockit time-code generator/reader with genlock output for multi-camera and double-system sound applications. In addition to generating ultra-stable time-code, time-code can be read from the SDI stream, the HDMI stream or from an external source.

Like the PIX 220 and PIX 240, the PIX 260 includes a sophisticated scaler and frame rate converter. Regardless of the incoming signal, the PIX recorders can record the signal after up, down or cross-conversion at the same rate or a different rate. Hardware-based 3:2 pull-down removal is included as well.
PIX 260’s convenient 1/2-rack, 2U chassis dimension allows it to be easily integrated into any existing environment. It is powered by 10-27 VDC through its four-pin XLR connector.

Sound Devices, LLC designs and manufactures portable audio mixers, digital audio recorders, and digital video recorders and related equipment for feature film, episodic television, documentary, news-gathering, and acoustical test and measurement applications. The thirteen-year old company designs and manufactures from their Reedsburg, Wisconsin headquarters with additional offices in Madison, WI and Highland Park, IL. For more information, visit the Sound Devices website, www.sounddevices.com.

132nd AES Convention Offers Rare Technical Tours

BUDAPEST: Rare technical tours of iconic examples of Budapest’s heritage of audio performance and production achievements will highlight the 132nd AES Convention. Scheduled for April 26-29 at the Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center, the event will feature a profusion of Papers, Workshops, Tutorials, and Special Events designed to provide attendees with invaluable educational and networking opportunities. Among the Technical tours are:

Hungarian Parliament: Seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, and one of Europe’s oldest legislative buildings, is set on the bank of the Danube. This Hungarian landmark is an unforgettable destination. In addition to a private viewing of this exquisite ‘Temple of the Nation,’ the tour will also focus on the building’s sound and voting system, and in-house HD TV complex. Preliminary registration is required (limit 10 persons).

Palace of Arts, Béla Bartók Concert Hall: Designed by architect Gábor Zoboki, Hungary’s National Concert Hall invokes the feel of a Gothic cathedral. Located at the heart of the new Palace of Arts, its acoustic qualities were assured by Russell Johnson, a legendary acoustician with over fifty years of field research and participation in the construction of several major opera houses and concert halls. The Hall is particularly noteworthy for a rare isolation technique, which inhibits vibration and noise leakage. It is also distinguished by its unique variable acoustic reverberation chambers. This Technical Tour will be introduced by the architect. Limit: 25 persons

Palace of Arts, Béla Bartók Concert Hall – Studios: In addition to its primary role as a performance venue, The National Concert Hall serves as an extraordinary live room for the buildings in-house recording studio. This tour will cover the audio, video production/ post-production suites, mastering studio, spacious in-house live room, and duplex communications link between the recording and broadcast studios. The studio was designed to facilitate the production of TV and video recordings, as well as high quality dubbing and voiceover work. Both live halls are linked to the studio via a sophisticated Studer system. Programs mixed on-site can be transmitted to radio and TV stations via a mobile broadcast truck or over dedicated ISDN lines. Limit: 20 persons

Times, locations and details of these and other AES Convention Technical Tours are posted on the Preliminary Calendar of Events: http://www.aes.org/events/132/calendar/calendar.cfm

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Photo 1. Hungarian Parliament
Photo 2. Palace of Arts, Béla Bartók Concert Hall

NYCTaper, Archivist of New York’s Live Indie Music Scene Captures the Best of Austin’s Music Festival with Sennheiser

Austin – April 11, 2012: Since starting his NYCTaper website in the mid-nineties, Dan Lynch (a.k.a. NYCTaper) has been recording and streaming hundreds of recordings over the Internet, reflecting the best that New York City’s live indie scene has to offer. Lynch, who strives to make the listener feel like he or she ‘was actually there,’ is well known to indie music lovers in New York City and well beyond — his listening audience extends from not only major U.S. metro cities like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, but to more distant geographies such as Japan, Europe and the far reaches of Australia.

While his own backyard is New York City, NYCTaper decided to capture the best of what Austin had to offer during its famous music week last month — listen to some of the results here. Armed with a pair of Sennheiser MKH 8040 cardioid microphones, his HD 280 closed back headphones and a trusty Edirol digital four-track portable recorder, he became “AustinTaper” for a week and recorded some of the best live set lists south of the Mason Dixon line.

What did you record while in Austin?
I have a pretty good relationship with Brooklyn Vegan over the years and the list of bands they were hosting was impressive. So I set up at Hotel Vegan in the afternoons and at the Impose Magazine parties during the evenings and recorded everything I could. In terms of genre, I am particularly drawn to indie rock but I also like any artist that has talent, imagination and something a little different than all the other music out there. For me, it can’t be a formula or promoted by any particular product — I want to see original talent.

What are some of the challenges you encountered in Austin versus what you’re used to in New York City?
Well, there is obviously a lot of extraneous noise when you are recording outdoors. The Sennheiser MKH 8040s are cardioid microphones and this makes them perfectly suited for this kind of thing. Normally, you’d have wind noise to deal with, but this was not an issue since the 8040s have a cardioid pattern and also come with these gigantic windscreens, which are very useful. Wind noise aside, there is not much you can do about the typical chatter you hear during these outdoor type shows, as well as some of the extraneous noise coming through from neighboring stages, but the pattern on the 8040 helped minimize these issues as much as possible.

Did you get a chance to audition the 8040s before you left for Austin?

Yes. Just before I left, I did back-to-back shows in New York City: I recorded Sharon Van Etten at the Bowery Ballroom and Craig Finn from The Hold Steady at Mercury Lounge. I used only the two channels of 8040s in both of these rooms, which I happen know very well, and they worked great. A typical problem I get in some rooms are reflections you get from the ceiling — which sound very ‘claustrophobic.’ With the 8040s, it was the first time I heard my recordings without these annoying reflections. So I knew they would work perfectly well in Austin well before I left.

What was your specific set up during each performance?
I had two Sennheiser MKH 8040s mics set up about eight inches apart in a 110 degree pattern on a stand, which was approximately 8 feet high. In addition to the two live mics, I sourced the left and right main mix feeds via direct outputs from the board. My recorder is an Edirol R44 4-track recorder with modded preamps, and I was capturing 24-bit audio. I was monitoring the recordings through my Sennheiser HD 280s, which are closed back, over the ear headphones.

How did the MKH 8040s perform on the ground in Austin?
First off, there was absolutely no issue capturing the high sound pressure levels on these mics — they can handle anything you throw at them and I have experienced virtually zero distortion. I am getting an extremely clean signal, and in terms of frequency response, the MKH 8040 delivers a sweet and crisp lower end and the highs are very tight. In general, the frequency response was so good that I didn’t have to EQ at all. The mic had basically a zero signal to noise ratio and there was no handling noise or self noise. Ultimately, the combination of the 8040’s cardioid pattern and its ability to perform without any audible distortion makes it the right mic for this kind of festival recording.

Tell me about your monitoring setup while you’re in the field.
For what I’m doing, maintaining isolation is very important because there is just so much noise happening all over, and to that end, I just can’t say enough good things about the Sennheiser HD 280s. Using these headphones, it was the first time I’ve ever recorded a show where I could only hear what was coming through the mics and the board — you are literally inside the cans and I love that. This means I can focus much more, because now I can hear what I’m doing and adjust things like mic positions or levels. They are also fit just right over my ears — I recorded over 35 shows while in Austin and experienced no discomfort whatsoever.

Do you also use the HD 280s while editing and mixing?
Yes. When I am using the HD 280s in hotel room for editing and mixing after a show, I can hear everything. Maybe there is a kick or a snare drum that was a little hot — now I can pinpoint that and make adjustments if necessary. I also enjoy the experience of just listening to music I’ve recorded on the HD 280s while I’m relaxing. One of the nice things about being NYC Taper or AustinTaper is that eventually I get to go home and actually listen to all these recordings, just like the fans of my site.

Listen to some of NYCTaper’s Austin tracks here: http://www.sennheiserusa.com/nyctaper

CORNELL UNIVERSITY DISCOVERS ORNITHOLOGICAL RESEARCH APP FOR SONNOX FRAUNHOFER PRO-CODEC

AES Convention A Catalyst For Innovative Plug-In’s Scientific Role

ITHACA, NY: At the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology’s Macaulay Library things can get a little wild. As the world’s largest scientific archive of biodiversity audio and video recordings, this collection encompasses over 195,000 sound and 60,000 video clips. Curator of Audio, Greg Budney and Supervising Audio Engineer Bill McQuay routinely investigate new tools to aid their research. Most recently they have been experimenting with the Pro-Codec, an audio plug-in created by UK-based Sonnox and Germany’s Fraunhofer (developer of MP3 technology).

Introduced last year, the Pro-Codec is a groundbreaking plug-in designed to revolutionize the process of mastering audio for online distribution. By enabling audio engineers to precisely audition codecs in real time, the Pro-Codec eliminates the prolonged cycle of encoding a music mix to MP3/AAC, previewing and tweaking it and then returning to their starting point to re-render. The abridged process frees the engineer to focus on producing a compensated, optimized mix.

Budney and McQuay first learned of the Pro-Codec while attending last year’s Audio Engineering Society Convention in NYC. “I spoke to the Fraunhover folks about our need to demonstrate appropriate and inappropriate uses of MP3 sound files to the scientific research community, and they directed us to the Sonnox booth,” McQuay says.

“We’re a resource for scientists studying evolutionary relationships between animals,” Budney explains. “Many species have genetically based sounds. By examining the vocalizations of a group of animals, their sounds can provide a window into their evolutionary relationships. Motion picture producers also use our collection,” he adds. “Skywalker Sound routinely contacts the Library for creative fodder, sometimes for sounds to build upon, sometimes for accurate natural world sounds.”

“We are trying to demonstrate to the scientific community that there may be appropriate and inappropriate uses for a lossy codec like MP3, which is based on human perception, but is not necessarily the perception of other species. In many cases we don’t know the perceptual limitations of these species – what frequencies they do and do not find important or encoded with meaningful information. We want to demonstrate that MP3 may be valuable for applications such as auditioning sounds, but may not be for serious sound analysis. The Pro-Codec provides a simple interface that allows us to consider what information in the frequency and time domains are being eliminated by the lossy MP3 codec,” McQuay adds.

McQuay and Budney want to assure scientists that they are listening to and analyzing sound with the greatest amount of content – audio content which might be critical to the species they are studying. “Scientists are really hip to spectrograms, they love those things,” McQuay says. “The Pro-codec’s real time FFT display graphically illustrates exactly what is happening to sound being processed by the MP3 or another lossy codec. And, the Pro-codec’s ability to make the sounds being eliminated audible helps to reinforce its lossy nature. Our hypothesis is that for serious sound analysis, the use of MP3 or other lossy formats may not be the appropriate choice.”

Research currently underway at the Macaulay Library will eventually be published in a scientific journal, pending the outcome of McQuay’s analysis. Budney points to the Library’s webpages, which provide technical support to researchers across a broad range of disciplines. “They might be marine mammalogists, ornithologists, or individuals studying animal behavior or bioacoustic phenomenon,” he says. “The library is recognized as a source of solid technical information by researchers around the globe. We’ll also be posting this information on our own webpages soon.”

Photo cap: Cornell Lab Curator of Audio, Greg Budney (left) and
Supervising Audio Engineer Bill McQuay

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For information on Sonnox Oxford Plugins please visit: www.sonnox.com

Myers Sponsors PBS TechCon 2012

TEAM MEMBERS TO PARTICIPATE IN LEARNING SEMINARS

Northampton, MA – Myers Information Systems – a leading developer of broadcast traffic, business, and content management software – today announced the company will again be a Silver-level sponsor of the Public Television Service’s annual technical conference, held in conjunction with the National Association of Broadcasters’ mid-April convention in Las Vegas. Myers has been a sponsor, seminar participant and exhibitor since the conference’s inception.

Myers’ personnel will contribute to several seminars and discussion groups, among them, “Do You Want to be a ProTrack Power User?” for station traffic management staff will be led by Crist Myers, president and CEO, along with CTO Tracy Carter, director of marketing Nancy Carter, plus team members Lloyd Ortman and Jim Pinard. Tracy Carter will also participate in panels entitled: “Traffic, Non-Real-Time is here – Are You Ready?” and “Centralcasting and Shared Master Control Update: A View from the Field.” Myers Information Systems will also have a strong exhibit hall presence, with team members available to answer questions and discuss ProTrack software features.

“We are extremely proud to continue our sponsorship and involvement with PBS,” said Crist Myers, president and CEO. “Their annual TechCon event provides an unequalled opportunity to exchange knowledge and ideas with PBS, its member stations and vendor partners, so that we can continue to bring forward efficient, innovative and cost-effective solutions to the public media marketplace.”

Myers’ highly regarded flagship suite, ProTrack, is available in both radio and television editions. It offers comprehensive scheduling and business management for individual, multichannel and multi-station facilities. Actively used by more than 226 media outlets, supporting more than 1,300 channels, ProTrack provides a high-level of structure and scalability, without sacrificing flexibility, for today’s rapidly evolving media environments.

ABOUT MYERS INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Myers Information Systems, Inc. has been developing broadcast management software since 1989. The Company provides technology and services for television, radio and other digital media providers designed to improve every aspect of their operations, from contracting to invoicing, media management to scheduling, and from trafficking to reconciliation. For more information, please visit: www.myersinfosys.com
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Myers Information Systems contact: Crist Myers
+1-413-585-9820 / sales@myersinfosys.com

Press contact: Desert Moon Communications / Harriet Diener
+1-845-512-8283 / harriet@desertmooncomm.com

Neumann KH 120 Monitors Provide Precision and Clarity for Mateusz Zechowski, Classical Recordist for Yale Symphony Orchestra

New Haven, Conn. – April 10, 2012 – Since 2000, Mateusz Zechowski’s STUDIOTEO has been providing freelance recording services to some of the most renowned orchestras, choirs and ensembles in the northeastern corridor. Based out of New Haven, Zechowski, who has just upgraded his monitoring system to include the Sennheiser-distributed Neumann KH 120s, has a versatile geographic reach working with clients in and around neighboring Yale University as well as New York City and Boston. He counts Yale Symphony Orchestra, Orchestra New England, New York Choral Society and Juilliard Baroque Ensemble among his clients.

“For classical recordists, there are generally two types of recordings,” says Zechowski. “One is taping concerts, in which you are more or less battling a recording environment that has already been chosen, and the other is ‘co-creating’ a recording with a client where you can exert more artistic control. Both scenarios — and in fact all the work I do — require top-notch studio monitors and now I am 100 percent dependent on the Neumann KH 120s.”

Zechowski is a native of Poland who studied at the Chopin Academy of Music in Warsaw and more recently at the Yale School of Music in New Haven. His recordings regularly appear on internationally regarded classical labels such as Naxos, Carus Verlag and Dels. The Neumann KH 120 active near field monitor is his monitor of choice whether he is on-location or working in his mastering suite in the lower level of his home. He was introduced to the KH 120 during the AES show in New York, when he met Sennheiser product specialist for studio products, Christopher Currier.

“I asked Christopher about the Neumann KH 120s at the booth, and he said he was happy to bring a pair by for me to demo in my studio,” Zechowski recalls. “When he did, I was in pretty deep shock because when compared to my other set — a respected large format British monitor — it was immediately apparent that the Neumann’s clarity, openness and large sound stage was far superior. My first impression was that they were on the bright side, but later I realized that this was due to its extended clarity.” The other thing that struck Zechowski was the amount of sheer bass force and dispersion in the low end: “It is quite incredible that such small monitors can generate such a large sound stage — especially in the lower frequencies. It is quite a remarkable achievement.”

Once Zechowski acquired the KH 120s and began using them on a regular basis on his work with choirs, small ensembles and large orchestras, the sonic attributes of the KH 120s became even more apparent: “These speakers are very precise, and this becomes very important when you have singing voices. With this kind of precision, you can hear and fix things immediately, whether it is a miking set up, EQ, or whatever. They give you an exact read.” The compact size and extreme portability of the KH 120s also enable Zechowski to bring them on location to his sessions. “They are a real winner for what I do and help me quickly assess what kind of mic set up I want to use, whether it is a Decca tree, a traditional spaced pair or a coincident mic arrangement.”

Zechowski now relies on the KH 120s to ensure his work sounds good outsideof the studio, as well. “All the mixes I do on the KH 120 translate beautifully to the external world, whether it is a mundane car stereo, a home-based system or audiophile setup alike,” he says.

As Zechowski continues his relentless pursuit to increase the quality of his recordings, the phone keeps on ringing: “In this profession, everything depends on word of mouth,” he observes. “Musicians relate to each other and recommend recording engineers like other people might recommend dentists. I’ve managed to build a steady group of loyal clients, because I am always looking to improve on what I’m doing.”

The Neumann KH 120 studio monitor
The Neumann KH 120 is a compact near-field studio monitor that delivers unprecedented accuracy and versatility within a broad range of monitoring environments. The KH 120 is perfect for tracking, mixing and mastering in music, broadcast, project and post-production studios.

The KH 120 represents the latest in acoustic and electronic simulation and measurement technologies to ensure the most accurate sound reproduction possible. It has a Mathematically Modeled Dispersion™ (MMD) waveguide, flexible acoustical controls, analog class-AB amplifiers, various input formats and an extensive mounting hardware range. All of this provides the user with the maximum versatility over a wide variety of acoustic conditions, source equipment and physical locations.

LAWO TO SHOWCASE SIGNIFICANT AUDIO BROADCAST DEVELOPMENTS AT NAB

*** The new RAVENNA DALLIS Master Card ***

Las Vegas, NV – April 10, 2012… Lawo, a leading manufacturer of digital audio networking systems and consoles for a wide range of applications from small to large scale audio production in television and radio, post production, and live sound is pleased to announce several important developments that will be showcased during the forthcoming NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) show. Showing a comprehensive range of audio production solutions that will appeal to the broadcast community, Lawo’s technological prowess will be on display at booth #2046, Hall C2.

During NAB, Lawo will be showcasing a variety of exciting product offerings, including implementations of RAVENNA Audio over IP technology, the world premiere of the company’s new SDI-Dock, JADE and Multitrack Editor software products, the new Version 4.16 software running on the mc²66 MKII broadcast console, Visual Extension for sapphire, Nova29, a crystal console, plus demos of practical applications using the Virtual Studio Manager for the device-independent control of audio and video equipment. more…

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The Radio magazine The Wire provides information from manufacturers and associations about industry news, products, technology and business announcements. The information shown here is posted by companies and their representatives and are not edited or previewed by the Radio magazine staff. The content providers are solely responsible for the content of their posts. If you would like your company's news and information to appear here, contact us.

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