132nd AES Convention Offers Diverse Tutorials

From Beach Boys Smile Sessions To Notes On The Brain

BUDAPEST: A destination for listening, learning and connecting, the 132nd AES Convention, will feature a uniquely varied assemblage of Tutorials. Scheduled for April 26-29 at the Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center, the gathering will draw attendees from around the world.

Tutorial Event highlights include:

The Making of The Beach Boys Smile Sessions: Arguably the greatest “lost” album of all time, The Beach Boys’ Smile sessions were finally released last November, in a variety of CD, vinyl and other digital configurations. Producer/Educator Barry Marshall will conduct a rare interview with Project co-producer Mark Linett about the legendary 1966-67 sessions. Their discussion will include the producer role Brian Wilson played in the project, as well a look at the technical and logistical challenges of mixing and mastering this landmark production from 45-year-old tapes at different configurations, speeds and sizes.

Noise on the Brain-Hearing Damage on the Other Side: Presenter: Poppy Crum – Did you know that drinking a glass of orange juice every day may actually protect your hearing? Most discussions of hearing damage focus on what happens to the cochlea and inner ear. While this understanding is crucial to predicting and avoiding trauma that can lead to hearing loss, this session will explore the latest research regarding the effects of acoustic and chemical trauma. It will also consider recent research in chemically preserving hearing and combating these conditions.

How Does It Sound Now? The Evolution of Audio: Presenter: Gary Gottlieb – One day Chet Atkins was playing guitar when a woman approached him. She said, “That guitar sounds beautiful.” Chet immediately quit playing and asked, “How does it sound now?” The quality of sound in Chet’s case clearly rested with the player, not the instrument. The technical and aesthetic quality of recorded music lies with engineers and producers, not solely on their equipment. This Tutorial will address the differences and similarities between their standards for excellence.

Please visit http://www.aes.org/events/132/calendar/calendar.cfm for a complete list of event titles, abstracts and presentation times.

Photo: Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center hosts the AES Convention April 26-29.

###

The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. With over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East, the organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

Neumann Introduces KK 204 and KK 205 Microphone Capsules, Designed to Complement Sennheiser’s 2000 Series Wireless Handheld Transmitter

Old Lyme, Conn. – April 16, 2012: Premium audio brand Neumann announced that it will be showcasing its new KK 204 and KK 205 microphone capsules at the Sennheiser booth [C2632] during NAB 2012. The new capsules, which are available in cardioid (KK 204) and supercardioid (KK 205) patterns, are compatible with Sennheiser’s 2000 series of wireless handheld transmitters.

The acoustic features of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads are derived from the multiple award-winning wired Neumann stage microphones, the KMS 104 and KMS 105. The KK 204, with its cardioid pattern, ensures the best possible suppression of sound originating from 180 degrees to the rear, while the supercardioid KK 205 has greater directivity, and maximizes incident sound from the front as compared to sound from the rear. Due to the “single polar pattern design,” the polar patterns are very uniform over the entire frequency range and provide excellent resistance to feedback.

Wolfgang Fraissinet, President of Neumann, commented: “Neumann capsules have already been used in combination with the Sennheiser SKM 5200 handheld transmitter for the past 10 years on some of the largest stages of the world, where the highest demands are placed on a high-resolution sound and transmission reliability. With the development of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads, the Neumann sound is now also available for the Sennheiser 2000 Series. The synergies between the key areas of expertise of Sennheiser handheld transmitters and Neumann capsule sound permit us to offer our customers a wireless system of absolutely uncompromisingly quality, even for the most demanding live applications.”

In developing the new capsules, particular importance was placed on the effective damping of pop sounds and handling noise, as well as on the extremely low level of self-noise. The KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads also have an extremely wide dynamic range and were designed to be very easy to service.

The aesthetic design complements the construction of the SKM 2000 handheld transmitter, and each capsule — like the SKM 2000 transmitter — is available in both nickel and black finishes. Each capsule includes a large nylon bag designed to hold the capsules, the handheld transmitter, battery packs and additional accessories.

    Both the KK 204 and KK 205 feature:

Reduced handling noise: Very low sensitivity to handling noise with a steep roll-off from approximately 78 Hz
Reduced plosives and sibilance: Both capsules feature a foam-lined grille to ensure smooth sound
Wide dynamic range with high SPL capability: 126 dB-A of dynamic range with 150 dB MAX SPL
Low feedback: Incredibly smooth and flat frequency response provided high gain before feedback
Easy to service components: Neumann understands the rigors of the road and has made the KK 204 and KK 205 exceptionally robust but easy to service if necessary

    Specifications:

Directional pattern: Cardioid (KK 204) / Super-cardioid (KK 205)
Frequency range: 40 Hz – 20 kHz
Sensitivity (at 1 kHz into 1 k?): 2.8 mV/Pa ± 1 dB
Equivalent noise level, CCIR1): 35 dB
Equivalent noise level, A-weighted1): 24 dB-A Max. SPL for 0.5% THD2) 150 dB
Dynamic range (A-weighted): >126 dB-A
Weight (including transmitter and power supply unit): Approx. 17.6 oz.
Dimensions (including SKM 2000)/length: 10.7 in., ø 2.2 in.

1) according to IEC 60268-1; CCIR-weighting according to CCIR 468-3, quasi peak; A-weighting according to IEC 61672-1, RMS
2) measured as equivalent el. input signal

Sennheiser adds the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter to its evolution wireless series

Old Lyme, Conn.–April 16, 2012– Audio specialist Sennheiser is extending its evolution wireless ew 300 G3 series with the addition of the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter. Whether it is for a speaker’s podium or for fast mobile use in video productions, the SKP 300 G3 converts any conventional cabled microphone quickly and easily into a wireless version. The phantom power required by condenser microphones is also supplied by the rugged transmitter – a highly versatile device that enables cabled microphones to become wireless with ease.

“With the new SKP 300 G3, we are further expanding the application possibilities for the evolution wireless series,” explained Robb Blumenreder, channel manager for professional systems products at Sennheiser’s U.S. headquarters. “The plug-on transmitter comes with its own phantom power supply, enabling it to be combined with any microphone with an XLR-3 output.”

For applications in the Installed Sound sector, the plug-on transmitter can be combined with an EM 300 G3 rack-mount receiver, thus making it possible, for example, to have a speaker’s podium without the visual interference of cables or to implement mobile lecterns. For video journalists, the SKP 300 G3 is an ideal partner for the EK 100 G3 camera receiver.

The SKP 300 is powered by two AA batteries or the optional BA 2015 accupack. The plug-on transmitter is available in eight frequency ranges, and is quickly and easily synchronized with its receiver using an infrared link.

The SKP 300 will be available in April 2012.

Caption:
SKP 300.jpg: Wireless with ease: the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter with switchable phantom power turns cabled microphones into wireless ones in next to no time

Technical Data: SKP 300

Modulation wideband FM
Frequency ranges A: 516–558 MHz; G: 566–608; GB: 606–648 MHz;
B: 626–668 MHz; C: 734–776 MHz; D: 780–822 MHz;
E: 823-865 MHz

Frequency banks 20 frequency banks each with up to 24
intermodulation-free presets; 6 frequency banks
with up to 24 frequencies freely selectable by the user
in 25 kHz steps
(Please note that the EK 100 G3 camera receiver has
only twelve frequencies per channel bank)

Switching bandwidth 42 MHz
RF output power 10/30 mW
Nominal/peak deviation ±24 kHz/±48 kHz
Phantom power 48 V ± 2 V
Compander system HDX
Audio frequency response 80–18,000 Hz
THD 0.9%
Signal-to-noise ratio > 120 dBA (1 mV peak deviation)
Audio input XLR-3F, balanced
Power supply 2 AA batteries (1.5 V) or BA 2015 accupack
Operating time typ. 8 hrs (30 mW RF power, without P48)
Dimensions 105 x 43 x 43 mm
Weight with batteries 195 g

Audio-Technica Offers More Reasons to Get Your Own Mic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3mcRXHAlbs&list=UU4Zvo2MGFsv-83wf40pG7Ig

Audio-Technica’s second humorous public service announcement graphically illustrates why NOT to share vocal microphones. Just like the first video, this new clip is an irreverent demonstration on why singers having their own microphones should be a basic right. Please take a look at this video, and feel free to post to your website, share on Facebook, add to newsletters, tweet or pass along to friends. Watch the video HERE

Audio-Technica has also prepared a new “Get Your Own Mic” landing page at http://www.audio-technica.com/getyourownmic, where visitors will be able to learn more about Audio-Technica’s vocal mics, and, of course, watch these acclaimed shorts.

RTW TM3 TouchMonitor Now Shipping Worldwide

Affordable, Compact Addition to TouchMonitor Range Supports Compliant Loudness Metering

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 16, 2012 — RTW, a leading vendor of visual audio meters for professional broadcast, production, post production and quality control, is pleased to announce that it is now shipping worldwide the new TM3 TouchMonitor. The TM3 is the latest introduction in the company’s successful range of products marking the next generation in compliant professional audio signal metering, which will all be on display at the RTW booth (C1844) during NAB 2012.

The TM3 includes features of the larger TM7 and TM9 TouchMonitor versions and is controlled using a touch-sensitive display. With its budget-friendly base price, a 4.3-inch touch screen and stylish exterior allowing for horizontal and vertical placement, the TM3 is a highly appealing, compact solution ideal for editorial offices, edit suites and small control rooms.

“The TM3 has received such wonderful feedback thus far and there have already been a large number of units sold in advance, so we are thrilled to begin shipment,” says Andreas Tweitmann, CEO, RTW. “It was important to us to provide the broadcast community with a range of solutions that will help them meet CALM Act compliance standards by the end of this year. The timing of the TM3’s shipment could not be better.”

Featuring PPM and true-peak instruments, the TM3 offers comprehensive loudness metering in compliance with all globally relevant standards, including EBU R128, ITU BS.1770-2/1771, ATSC A/85 and ARIB. Instruments include single-channel and summing bar graphs, an LRA instrument and numerical displays. The basic version handles analog and digital stereo audio, while the 5.1 option adds the support of six-channel digital input.

Full technical details about the TM3 and all of RTW’s products can be found at www.rtw.de.

About RTW
RTW, based in Cologne (Germany), has more than 40 years of experience in designing, producing, and marketing advanced recording-studio systems. The company focuses its business on professional audio signal metering tools that are in use in the leading recording studios as well as by radio and TV broadcasters worldwide. The current product portfolio highlights the TouchMonitor range, a new series of tools for visual signal analysis and comprehensive loudness metering. The TouchMonitor combines the highest of flexibility and modularity with an intuitive user interface and touchscreen-based multichannel-analysis features, integrating exceptional surround-signal visualization using the unique and groundbreaking Surround Sound Analyzer. The high-end SurroundControl series of products with fully fledged loudness measuring combines the convenient metering options of the RTW surround display devices and the control functions of an eight-channel monitoring controller.

For more information, visit www.rtw.de or www.facebook.com/rtw.de, or call +49 (0) 221 709130.

Clear-Com Announces Seamless Roaming For Tempest2400 at the 2012 NAB Show

New Product Breakthrough Delivers Uninterrupted Coverage for Large-Scale Broadcasts

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 16, 2012 ? Clear-Com, a global leader in critical voice communication systems, today is pleased to unlock the Seamless Roaming capability for its Tempest2400 digital wireless intercom at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C8008). Further enhancing one of the most feature-rich and robust system within Clear-Com’s wireless product line, Tempest Seamless Roaming will be most applicable in large mixed facilities that are separated by sizeable distances such as campus buildings, multi-studio environments and/or outdoor venues.

“With Seamless Roaming, a Tempest2400 wireless BeltStation can cover an extensive area with multiple zones that would not be adequately supported by a single BaseStation installation,” says Craig Fredrickson, Clear-Com’s wireless product manager. “This allows broadcasters to focus on critical production cues rather than having to change the settings on their wireless BeltStations when moving within a venue.”

Tempest Seamless Roaming is meant for individuals on the production team who must move freely and wirelessly from a given coverage area to another without interference or dropout of intercom communication. Base stations are linked together with the newest ZSync (Zero Synchronization) Technology. The ZSync Technology provides a zero sync reference that coordinates the hopping patterns of all connected BaseStations every time the system is powered up, irrespective of random time variation in power up sequences, to provide improved system performance and a seamless wireless experience.

With the Seamless Roaming feature, BeltStation users can migrate between as many as 16 different Tempest2400 BaseStations (coverage areas or zones). Both Seamless Roaming and iSelect Roaming are available to accommodate virtually every application need.

The Tempest2400, designed with Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) technology, utilizes a narrow band signal that is continually changing frequencies to powerfully burn through RF noise and interference. Because of FHSS technology, the Tempest system does not compete with signals from other 2.4 GHz wireless devices, minimizing frequency coordination and enabling flawless performance. Moreover, the wireless system features state-of-the-art 2xTX Transmission Voice Data Redundancy, which sends each packet of audio data twice on different frequencies and through different antennas, ensuring uninterrupted audio communications. Via four- and two-wire connections, it can interoperate with other Clear-Com intercom systems, as well as those from other manufacturers.

Tempest2400 offers three different modes of operations—Normal, Shared and Split. All modes are supported under the Seamless Roaming function. A single Tempest2400 in Normal mode can support between one and five full-duplex wireless users who always need to speak on the intercom system. However, in Split or Shared mode, an unlimited number of users can monitor the conversation and share talk capability. A combination of Tempest systems operating in either Normal or Shared mode can co-exist in the same environment for the ultimate in flexibility. Each digital BeltStation offers four audio channels. By stacking up to 10 BaseStations together, 50 independent, full-duplex wireless BeltStations can operate together in a single system.

About Clear-Com
Clear-Com, an HME company, is a global provider in professional voice communications systems since 1968. We develop and market proven intercom technologies such as Analog & Digital Partyline, Digital Matrix, Wireless and Intercom-over-IP systems for critical communication applications in broadcast, performance venues, military, government and enterprise markets. Recognized for our legacy of intercom innovations, production teams around the world have come to depend on Clear-Com for clear, reliable and scalable communications solutions. For more information, please visit www.clearcom.com.

About HM Electronics, Inc. (HME)
HM Electronics, Inc. is a diverse group of companies providing solutions that enhance productivity and customer service in markets including restaurants, sports and professional audio. Founded in 1971, we sell, service and support products in 89 countries worldwide, via company-owned offices in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and China, and an extensive network of HME-authorized distributors, dealers and service agents. Every day quick service restaurants take over 24 million orders using HME systems. With the recent acquisition of Clear-Com, HME is the world’s leading provider of professional intercom systems. To learn more, visit www.hme.com.

SSL Introduces V5 Software for C100 HDS Digital Broadcast Console at the 2012 NAB Show

Upgrade Introduces Dual Operator Functionality

LAS VEGAS – Solid State Logic, the world’s leading manufacturer of advanced analogue and digital audio consoles, is pleased to announce V5 software for the C100 HDS Digital Broadcast Console at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C2013). This new software release will implement a range of features to enable Dual Operator Mode for SSL’s C100 HDS specialized broadcast console. While the development of V5 software responds to feedback from a wide range of SSL clients, the upgrade is particularly relevant to mobile installations where complex productions demand two operators but space and weight are at a premium.

“As the broadcast industry continues to encounter more complex production situations involving multiple mixes, our team has developed the V5 software enhancement for the C100 HDS to meet the needs of two mix engineers at the same time,” says Piers Plaskitt, CEO of SSL, Inc. “V5 allows our most powerful digital console to be installed in a space and weight conscious OB van, for example, to easily handle a live international sporting event presented in different languages, therefore requiring different simultaneous mixes. We believe the V5 software upgrade will further solidify the C100’s impact on the market.”

SSL’s Dual Operator Mode provides two operators the ability to have independent physical controls and access to shared audio assets, through a single console processing engine, Routing and I/O configuration. The system allows for an unlimited number of consecutive eight-channel fader bays to be assigned to a 2nd operator. These bays can be located at either end of a C100 console or separated and installed in a remote location such as a production gallery. The 2nd operator bays can be specified with a dedicated Master Tile to provide access to EQ, dynamics, aux sends and various routing functions, or specified without a Master Tile for simple fader-only operation.

Dual Operator Mode splits the C100 PFL system to provide independent PFL control for each operator with monitoring via headphones, or the main or mini monitor outputs. If both operators access the PFL system simultaneously and route to the monitor outputs, the PFL system delivers a sum of all selected channels. V5 also introduces a new momentary ‘non-latching’ PFL mode to facilitate shared use of monitor outputs.

Each operator will also have independent access to user layers to facilitate selection of individual channels to be laid out in each operator’s area and individual channels that are a shared resource, allowing simultaneous control from both operator areas. A fully redundant C100 system will see both Operator areas as a single console, delivering seamless redundancy for both users. For streamlined project recall for an entire Dual Operator system, all settings for both operators are also saved within a single project.

Solid State Logic is the world’s leading manufacturer of analogue and digital audio consoles and provider of creative tools for music, broadcast and post production professionals. For more information about our award-winning products, please visit: www.solidstatelogic.com.

John Buckman To Present 132nd AES Convention Keynote Address

Innovative Online Label Founder To Discuss Successful Indie Music Models

BUDAPEST: John Buckman, founder of several online music businesses including Berkeley, CA-based Magnatune, has been selected as Keynote speaker for the 132nd AES Convention. The event will be held April 26-29, at the Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center. Currently serving as Chairman of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Buckman is an entrepreneur inspired by the causes of Internet freedom and free culture. He founded the online record label Magnatune in 2003 as a reaction to his experiences with the music industry. Magnatune strives to be fair both to recording artists and consumers alike and is considered a solid example of a successful “sharing economy” based business model.

Entitled “Small And Beautiful: Models for Successful Independent Music Businesses,” Buckman’s Keynote will address his experience in developing a successful online music business. Buckman’s egalitarian business practices are distinguished by non-exclusive agreements with musicians. His pioneering Fair Trade Music Philosophy is based on equally shared profits with his artists, and allowing them to retain full rights to their own music. Since founding Magnatune, Buckman has signed more than 250 recording artists across multiple genres including Classical, Electronica, World, Alt Rock, Jazz and Hard Rock. He is about to launch iLicenseMusic.com. In addition to such other internet music companies as MoodMixes.com (background music for restaurants) and ToneGnome.com (audio engineering services over the Internet), he has also had a successful career as an audio engineer.

Profiled by Inc. Magazine, The Economist, Forbes, and other major publications for his innovative approach to online music distribution, Buckman is also Founder and CEO of BookMooch, an innovative community for sharing over 1 million books each year in 91 countries via the Internet.

Highlighted by a diverse program of Papers, Workshops, Tutorials, Recording, Hearing, Broadcast, Game Audio, Student, Career, and Special Events, the 132nd AES Convention will epitomize the Audio Engineering Society mandate of providing a platform for listening, learning and connecting. Visit http://www.aes.org/events/132/calendar/calendar.cfm for a complete list of event titles, abstracts and presentation times.

Photo: John Buckman will present the Keynote address at the 132nd AES Convention in Budapest on April 26.

###

The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. With over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East, the organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

Sound Devices Debuts PIX 260 Production Video Recorder at the 2012 NAB Show

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 16, 2012 — Sound Devices, experts in portable audio and video products for field production, introduces its new PIX 260 production audio/video recorder at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C2546). Based on Sound Devices’ field-proven PIX 220 and PIX 240 recorders, the rack-mounted PIX 260 is a file-based video/audio recorder/player that seamlessly replaces tape-based video decks in production and post-production environments.

Using the Apple ProRes or Avid DNxHD codecs, the PIX 260 records and plays files up to 220 Mbps in high-quality 10-bit 4:2:2 video as well as 32 tracks of 48 kHz audio. Files from the PIX 260 are ready for direct import into Avid and Final Cut editing environments, eliminating time-consuming transferring and transcoding. Files can also play out of the PIX 260 for realtime applications.

Continuing the company’s deep heritage in production sound, Sound Devices has infused the PIX 260 with 32-track record/playback capability. In addition to 16 channels of embedded SDI audio and eight channels of HDMI audio, the PIX 260 also accepts eight channels of line-level analog I/O and eight channels of AES digital audio. Using Dante, the PIX 260 can accept and transmit up to 32 channels of audio over Ethernet.

The PIX 260 has a built-in five-inch 800 x 480-pixel video display that allows users to view video and setup-menu selections. With its extensive control capabilities, the PIX 260 is a flexible video playback source that is compatible with Final Cut Pro 7, Final Cut Pro X and Avid sessions. The PIX 260 can be controlled by both external RS-422 and via Ethernet through the embedded Web server, allowing for machine transport control over Ethernet-based networks.

Up to four SATA drives can be connected to the PIX 260 simultaneously. All four drives can be recorded to simultaneously, for RAID-1 type redundancy and to eliminate the need for post-record copying when multiple copies are required.

The PIX 260 includes a built-in Ambient Clockit time-code generator/reader with genlock output for multi-camera and double-system sound applications. In addition to generating ultra-stable time-code, time-code can be read from the SDI stream, the HDMI stream or from an external source.

Like the PIX 220 and PIX 240, the PIX 260 includes a sophisticated scaler and frame rate converter. Regardless of the incoming signal, the PIX recorders can record the signal after up, down or cross-conversion at the same rate or a different rate. Hardware-based 3:2 pull-down removal is included as well.
PIX 260’s convenient 1/2-rack, 2U chassis dimension allows it to be easily integrated into any existing environment. It is powered by 10-27 VDC through its four-pin XLR connector.

Sound Devices, LLC designs and manufactures portable audio mixers, digital audio recorders, and digital video recorders and related equipment for feature film, episodic television, documentary, news-gathering, and acoustical test and measurement applications. The thirteen-year old company designs and manufactures from their Reedsburg, Wisconsin headquarters with additional offices in Madison, WI and Highland Park, IL. For more information, visit the Sound Devices website, www.sounddevices.com.

132nd AES Convention Offers Rare Technical Tours

BUDAPEST: Rare technical tours of iconic examples of Budapest’s heritage of audio performance and production achievements will highlight the 132nd AES Convention. Scheduled for April 26-29 at the Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center, the event will feature a profusion of Papers, Workshops, Tutorials, and Special Events designed to provide attendees with invaluable educational and networking opportunities. Among the Technical tours are:

Hungarian Parliament: Seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, and one of Europe’s oldest legislative buildings, is set on the bank of the Danube. This Hungarian landmark is an unforgettable destination. In addition to a private viewing of this exquisite ‘Temple of the Nation,’ the tour will also focus on the building’s sound and voting system, and in-house HD TV complex. Preliminary registration is required (limit 10 persons).

Palace of Arts, Béla Bartók Concert Hall: Designed by architect Gábor Zoboki, Hungary’s National Concert Hall invokes the feel of a Gothic cathedral. Located at the heart of the new Palace of Arts, its acoustic qualities were assured by Russell Johnson, a legendary acoustician with over fifty years of field research and participation in the construction of several major opera houses and concert halls. The Hall is particularly noteworthy for a rare isolation technique, which inhibits vibration and noise leakage. It is also distinguished by its unique variable acoustic reverberation chambers. This Technical Tour will be introduced by the architect. Limit: 25 persons

Palace of Arts, Béla Bartók Concert Hall – Studios: In addition to its primary role as a performance venue, The National Concert Hall serves as an extraordinary live room for the buildings in-house recording studio. This tour will cover the audio, video production/ post-production suites, mastering studio, spacious in-house live room, and duplex communications link between the recording and broadcast studios. The studio was designed to facilitate the production of TV and video recordings, as well as high quality dubbing and voiceover work. Both live halls are linked to the studio via a sophisticated Studer system. Programs mixed on-site can be transmitted to radio and TV stations via a mobile broadcast truck or over dedicated ISDN lines. Limit: 20 persons

Times, locations and details of these and other AES Convention Technical Tours are posted on the Preliminary Calendar of Events: http://www.aes.org/events/132/calendar/calendar.cfm

###

Photo 1. Hungarian Parliament
Photo 2. Palace of Arts, Béla Bartók Concert Hall

About

The Radio magazine The Wire provides information from manufacturers and associations about industry news, products, technology and business announcements. The information shown here is posted by companies and their representatives and are not edited or previewed by the Radio magazine staff. The content providers are solely responsible for the content of their posts. If you would like your company's news and information to appear here, contact us.

Calendar

November 2014
S M T W T F S
« Oct    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30  

Your Account

Subscribe

Subscribe to RSS Feed

Subscribe to MyYahoo News Feed

Subscribe to Bloglines

Google Syndication