Lights Out for the Minimoog Voyager Select Series

Today Moog Music announced its plans to discontinue production of the Minimoog Voyager Select Series, the top selling backlit analog synthesizer of all time. Over the last 6 years the Select Series has been used in studios and on stages around the globe. Whether it’s Madonna, Dr. Dre, Alicia Keys, CeeLo Green, Lady Gaga or Sugarland, the custom combinations of color and finish reflects the unique aesthetic and personality of its owner. Moog will continue building the Select Series through the end of the year, with the final Select Series leaving the factory on Jan 1, 2013.

This is the last chance ever for prospective buyers to purchase a Select Series Voyager, but it will also be their best chance. During the remaining months of production, Moog has reduced the selling price on all Select Series Voyagers from $3,659 to $2,999.
 
“We felt it was important to give musicians who had always dreamt of customizing a handcrafted Voyager a final chance to build one at an unprecedented price,” said Mike Adams, CEO Moog Music Inc. “We are a small company that still builds by hand, so sometimes we have to make hard decisions about ending the life of even our most favorite products. However, history has shown that discontinued Minimoogs, like the Model D and the Old School, have a tendency to become highly sought after collector’s items. I’m sure we’ll see them on stages and in studios for years to come.” said Adams.
 
The discontinuation of the Select Series comes just as Moog begins celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Minimoog Voyager. The first Minimoog Voyager introduced the world to the next generation of analog synthesizers in 2002. To honor this milestone, Moog has created an interactive ten-year retrospective containing the untold history of the Voyager, artist profiles and performances, free gifts, and other announcements that are yet to come.
 
About the Sale:
Minimoog Voyager Select Series will be gone by 2013. Until that time the price has been reduced from $3,659 to $2,999. Available direct from the Moog website http://www.moogmusic.com/products/minimoog-voyagers/minimoog-voyager-select-series or your favorite Moog Dealer http://moogmusic.com/dealers/

Jampro Antennas To Upgrade FM Signals For Utah State University

Sacramento, CA – Jampro Antennas, Inc. — a world leader in the manufacture and design of radio frequency components and antennas for radio and television transmission — today announced the award of a comprehensive turnkey project to consolidate three FM signals for KUER, the Salt Lake City-based radio station operated by Utah State University.

Jampro will deliver and install an FM broadband panel antenna, model JAHD Arrowhead Dipole with protective radomes, plus transmission line and required monitoring. An RCCC Constant Impedance combiner will bring the KUER, KUER-HD2 and KUER-HD3 signals together. The system will be housed in a harsh mountaintop environment above 12,000 feet in one of the country’s few remaining manned transmitter sites.

“We installed the station’s initial antenna system in 1973; periodic upgrades and additions have extended their range and signal quality,” said Alex Perchevich, president of Jampro. “The University selected us for this significant upgrade based on our cost-effective technology and proven track record of reliability – we sincerely appreciate their loyalty and confidence in Jampro.”

About Jampro
Jampro Antennas Inc., established to answer the need for quality broadcast systems at a reasonable price, is a leading supplier of antennas, combiners & filters and RF components for every application in the broadcast industry. Reputed for innovation and customization, Jampro builds each system to the specifications of the individual broadcaster. From the first system delivered in 1954 to those installed today, the Company is committed to consistent performance and quality founded on solid engineering. Today, over 15,000 broadcasters worldwide benefit from the quality and performance provided by Jampro systems. For additional JAMPRO information, please visit: www.jampro.com.

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Jampro Contact: Sonia Del Castillo
+1-916-383-1177 • Sonia@jampro.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener • +1-845-512-8283
harriet@desertmooncomm.com

RTW RELOCATES COLOGNE HEADQUARTERS

Move Supports the Company’s Continued Growth and Streamlines Operations

COLOGNE, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 – RTW, a leading vendor of visual audio meters for professional broadcast, production, post production and quality control, is pleased to announce that it will be settled into its new office on September 25. The new company headquarters, still located in Cologne, will now occupy two floors of a building that was once home to the German staff of Sony Corporation. While the company’s phone numbers and email addresses will not change, its new mailing address will be:

RTW GmbH & CO. KG
Am Wassermann 25
50829 Köln – (Cologne)
Germany

“We are very happy to move into a new space that is more modern and will help us to better streamline our operations,” says Andreas Tweitmann, CEO, RTW. “This new building will offer us new amenities that will help us to further focus on developing and manufacturing innovative solutions for the broadcast market.”

RTW has recently experienced much success with it TouchMonitor line of audio meters. The TM3, an affordable, compact version of the original TM7 and TM9, is quickly becoming an industry standard. The recently announced TM3-3G is sure to follow in its successful footsteps. The latest addition to the TouchMonitor line seamlessly allows the TM3′s current hardware and software design to visualize, convert and replay 3G SDI signals in TV and video production and post-production applications, offering a feature set unrivalled in its class.

Harris Demonstrates New PR&E Studio Enhancements for Networked Audio Environments at The Radio Show

DALLAS, September 19, 2012 (The Radio Show, Hilton Anatole, Booth 604)Harris Broadcast Communications today introduces a series of user-friendly features for analog and digital studio environments at The Radio Show, giving broadcasters more tools to empower on-air, production and networking capabilities in distributed and consolidated studio architectures.

Harris introduces programmable button panels that enhance routing capabilities and protect signal destinations, as well as standard metering designs across all Harris® PR&E® studio consoles to improve ease of use. New quad-meter enhancements for its largest console line also increase confidence metering for operators monitoring several on- and off-air sources at once.

Programmable Button Panels
The new “smart,” dynamic LCD button panels give operators and producers five programmable buttons to initiate audio routes or commands to and from any location. Foremost, the panels shield the air chain and other destinations from accepting undesired audio, maximizing protection in networked studio environments. This means that an on-air operator would need to approve a “request” from another studio to introduce that audio to the program. The buttons similarly protect for remote signal contributions, allowing operators to cleanly initiate mix-minus feeds on-air.

Operators benefit further from clarity on the actual “owner” of the audio source, with rich text and unique color screens offering clear visual information about where each signal originates. This is a key differentiator from competing systems that don’t identify the origination point.

Harris now offers its new programmable button panels on PR&E® RMXdigital® consoles, the VMReact™ logic processing engine and other PR&E® VistaMax™ audio networking systems. VMReact, introduced last year at The Radio Show, is a virtual toolbox that allows studio operators and engineers to customize and automate multiple processes in networked studio environments. This includes everything from switching audio routes to creating contact closures for various events.

Uniformity and Ease of Use
Harris enhances the look and feel of its metering applications at The Radio Show, introducing a standard design for meters, clocks and timers across its RMXdigital, NetWave® and Oasis™ on-air/production consoles. Harris also introduces quad-meters for most RMXdigital consoles, allowing operators to monitor additional sources. This improves metering confidence by ensuring signal integrity for program and off-air sources, such as web streaming and network routing.

Harris is also demonstrating its recently-introduced RMXengine™, offering an on-demand mix-minus and IFB for every RMXdigital fader. The auxiliary device also enables advanced dual-console operation for sophisticated dual-anchor studio operations — bridging two consoles together in a single studio. The aforementioned new programmable button panels also bring benefits to these applications, allowing for negotiated and protected air chain control between two consoles.

About Harris Broadcast Communications
Harris Broadcast Communications offers products, systems and services that provide interoperable workflow solutions for broadcast, cable, satellite and out-of-home networks. The Harris ONE™ solution brings together highly integrated and cost-effective products that enable advanced media workflows for emerging content delivery business models. Additional information about Harris Broadcast Communications is available at www.broadcast.harris.com.

# # #

Live From SF! AES Convention Preliminary Events Calendar

New Tracks, Comprehensive Event/Exhibitor/Registration Details Online Now!

NEW YORK: With just five weeks to go until “Show Time,” the AES continues to update the Preliminary Event Calendar. Packed with vivid abstracts, dates, times and presenter details, the AES/PEC is the culmination of an intensive year of activity. The 133rd Convention looms as the most colorful, informative, timely and far-ranging AES event ever. From Broadcast/Streaming to Education, Game Audio, Historical, Live Sound, Papers, Platinum, Product Design, Special Events, Tech Tours, Tutorials and Workshops, the 133rd AES Convention is the definitive crash course on everything audio.

“In addition to our traditional program, this Convention marks the introduction of three timely new tracks,” reports Committee Co-Chair Jim McTigue. “We are extremely enthusiastic about the 3-Day Project Studio Expo developed in partnership with UK-based Sound On Sound editors and Craig Anderton to explore issues and innovations that make Project Studios a pivotal trend in today’s recording environment. We are also extremely pleased with our Sound For Pictures and Networked Audio Tracks. These events epitomize the AES mandate as the industry’s most authoritative platform for addressing critical issues of technical concern,” McTigue says.

“As with our totally upgraded Mobile App, our Preliminary Calendar has been carefully fine-tuned to make it the most comprehensive and user-friendly edition ever,” reports Committee Co-Chair Valerie Tyler. “Attendees will find it much easier to navigate. The color-coded grid provides instantly accessible drop-down abstracts. Dates and times are clearly illustrated. While we make a point of emphasizing the fact that this is a ‘Preliminary’ Although Calendar changes continue to be posted right up to October 26, the site will be enormously helpful to attendees in strategizing their show schedules.”

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Visit these links for more details:

* http://www.aes.org/events/133/calendar/calendar.cfm
* http://www.aes.org/events/133/hotels/
* http://www.aes.org/events/133/registration/
* http://www.aes.org/events/133/exhibitors/exhibitors.cfm
* http://www.aes.org/mobile/

PHOTO: The 133rd AES Convention will be held in SF’s Moscone Center Oct. 26 – 29.

The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. The AES counts over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East. The organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

The Music Producers Guild Helps Define A New Industry Standard

The Music Producers Guild’s Mastering Group has achieved a significant breakthrough for all recording artists and other copyright owners by working with the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) to create an industry standard for embedding ISRCs within digital music files.

This major step forward will make accurate file identification and content tracking much easier and could help royalty agencies develop more precise systems for payments, thereby safeguarding the incomes of all artists and copyright owners when their recordings are played on air.

MPG Mastering Group board member and Alchemy Mastering Engineer Barry Grint, who led the initiative, says: “ISRC stands for International Standard Recording Code. Every song released – and indeed every version of that song – is allocated a unique ISRC by the record label. In the past the ISRC information was included within sub data streams of a CD, so a track could be identified by its associated ISRC.

“However, now that we have entered the digital age and are increasingly using digital WAV files, the ability to securely associate ISRC data with specific tracks has been lost because the only common way to incorporate ISRC into a WAV file is via the file name. If someone renames the file – or if the name is truncated or amended by a software program – the vital ISRC information can easily be lost. Unfortunately many record companies are not aware of this and simply assume that ISRCs are being embedded into WAV files. Technically that just isn’t possible so many mastering engineers were simply adding the code to the file title, which was an insecure practise.”

The MPG Mastering Group recognized that this was a major problem and that the industry needed an approved method for embedding ISRC data within a WAV file. Fortunately the EBU had developed the Broadcast WAV File (BWF), a variant of the WAV file for use by broadcasters. Although this variation allows for metadata to be added within the file, no standard had been defined as to how and where the data should be stored. Also workstation manufacturers offering the ability to create BWF files did not have a consensus as to the fields in which data should be entered.

Barry Grint approached the EBU and asked them to adapt the BWF standard so that ISRC’s could once again be included in metadata in a regular way.

“The new system is simple to implement and the MPG is encouraging workstation manufacturers and record companies to use BWF in preference to WAV as the standard specification for file exchange,” Barry Grint says. “Once adopted, this system will allow ISRC to flow through the whole production chain. iTunes and other aggregators will be able to pull the ISRC through during encoding and broadcast playout systems can easily be adapted to recognise the ISRC, making airplay reporting far more accurate.

“This is a major step forward for the music industry as it gives us the opportunity to identify with certainty every digital Master file regardless of how that file is named. We would like to thank the team at the EBU for recognizing the importance of this to the MPG and the Music Industry worldwide and the speed with which they were able to bring this about. By making ISRC the cornerstone of asset management and royalty reporting, we should be able to ensure a more accurate system of royalty payments and writer/performer credits, thereby supporting the income of all recording artists and copyright owners well into the future.”

-ends-

About Music Producers Guild (UK):

The Music Producers Guild (UK) is an independent and democratic organisation that encourages the highest standards of music production, and actively engages with other music industry organisations to campaign and lobby on matters of important mutual interest.

The MPG represents and promotes the interests of all those involved in the production of recorded music, including producers, engineers, mixers, re-mixers, programmers and mastering engineers. www.mpg.org.uk

While in the Announcer Booth, Rob Reider — ‘The Voice of Aviation’ — Depends on Sennheiser for Unsurpassed Comfort and Clarity

If you’ve ever been to an aviation show, you’ve very likely heard the warm, hospitable and instantly recognizable voice of Rob Reider, the most famous and accomplished aviation announcer in North America. Reider, who has announced no less than 135 air shows in the past five years alone, has brought the excitement of aviation into the hearts of millions of fans over the course of his aviation announcing career, which is already well into its third decade. Reider is a recipient of The International Council of Air Show’s “Sword of Excellence” award — the highest honor an air show professional can receive. On the announcer’s stand, he relies solely on Sennheiser headsets to make sure his communication with the fans and the control tower is perfectly clear.

When did you first experience a passion for aviation?
I have been an aviation fan since I was a kid when my dad got me interested. He soloed in a Piper Cub after WWII, but never got his private pilot’s license. He took me to the Air Force museum a long, long time ago when it was nothing compared to what it is now. So my passion kind of grew from there, and from watching the Sky King television show back in the ’50s. It all stayed with me.

Tell me about the ‘power of the voice’ as relates to announcing aviation.
The power of the voice is what engages people and it’s especially good when it is balanced with the visual. I’ve learned when to shut up at times and just let the airplanes make the music. In the case of air shows, people often don’t know what it is that they are seeing. If I can bring them closer to what they are seeing, then it becomes way more than ‘radio with pictures.’ Audio is absolutely fundamental. If you are watching a television show and if the sound goes away, you can lose the story pretty quickly; but if the picture goes away and you still have the sound, you can stay involved with the story.

How did you first come to use Sennheiser headsets in the booth?
I used to wear both an over the ear headphone and ear bud from a competitor. If the air boss wanted to talk to me, I had to pull the bud out of an ear, take the whole ear cup off, then jam it all back in. When I had the opportunity to try a Sennheiser headset, an HMD 26, it was so easy to take on and take off. Perhaps more importantly, it was comfortable, not heavy and sounded infinitely better than the competitor’s. Since then I have not gone back. I no longer have to worry about all that stuff on my ears and all these cords coming down – now I’ve got my dark glasses and my Sennheiser headset with just one wire. I have it set up so I can communicate directly with everyone I need to, I can run my own music and communicate through the PA system and it’s all seamless. I am now in my second full season using the Sennheiser HMD 26s, which are part of Sennheiser’s HME/C 26 family of broadcast and pilot’s headsets. I couldn’t be happier that I made the change.

How important is intelligibility and clarity for you?
With the HMD 26, I can always hear myself very clearly. If I cannot hear myself, I will lose my voice — this is the biggest danger for me. So having good headphones so I can hear myself well not only makes for a better experience for the audience but also really protects my chops. As far production is concerned, the timing is crucial. So I can’t afford to miss a cue and the audio — and in this sense, the audio is everything. The music starts and its, “Ladies and Gentlemen, the aerial entertainment continues at….” The microphone on the HMD 26 sounds awesome; I don’t have to EQ at all compared to the mics I used to use.

How about comfort? Where does this come into play?
The headphones have to be comfortable otherwise I will get fatigued and will be miserable by the end of the day. I’m wearing this thing sometimes 6 hours a day — as long or longer than any other sportscaster ever does. Ever since I switched to Sennheiser the comfort hasn’t been an issue and I never have to think about it.

What keeps you going, having done aviation announcing for so long?
I still get goose bumps doing this job and even though I have been doing this a long time, I am so far from jaded. I am a little kid who has found a way to make money doing what he loves to do. I don’t get nervous anymore but I try to get into the zone as quickly as possible.

    Caption:

Rob Reider, pictured with his Sennheiser HMD 26 aviation headset.

Sonnox Fraunhofer Pro-Codec Version 2 Ships

Featuring Apple AAC iTunes Plus Codec And MPEG Surround Support

Oxford, UK – September 13, 2012: Fraunhofer IIS, the world’s renowned source for audio and multimedia technologies, and innovative plug-in designer/manufacturer Sonnox Ltd. today announce the second generation Sonnox Fraunhofer Pro-Codec Plug-In. Initially released in 2011 to global praise, the Pro-Codec Version 2 introduces the ability to master for iTunes and supports the latest multi-channel audio codecs.

For the first time, the Pro-Codec Plug-In enables engineers to use Apple’s iTunes Plus codec for real-time auditioning, making it a powerful time-saving tool to efficiently mix directly for the “Mastered for iTunes” program. Sonnox has added Apple’s iTunes Plus codec to the Plug-In to enable the exact clipping behavior of the iTunes encoding chain to be monitored, and levels corrected if necessary, saving time and ensuring high quality output during the mixing process.

In addition, Sonnox and Fraunhofer have integrated the latest MPEG Surround codec along with Advanced Audio Coding Low Complexity (AAC-LC) multi-channel and High Efficiency Advanced Audio Coding (HE-AAC) multi-channel support, making the codecs conveniently available for producers of surround music. These codecs provide superior audio quality for surround sound mixing and are used in surround broadcasting and streaming.

The Pro-Codec Version 2 continues to provide Fraunhofer implementations of all major MPEG audio codecs and lossless codecs such as mp3 High Definition (mp3HD) and High Definition Advanced Audio Coding (HD-AAC). This establishes the Pro-Codec as the most powerful codec plug-in available for digital audio workstations.

Version 2 of the Sonnox Fraunhofer Pro-Codec Plug-In is available now at the same price as Version 1 at $495. A free upgrade will be available for Version 1 owners.

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For more information, click here: http://bit.ly/QIJuzX

(or visit www.sonnox.com)

About Fraunhofer

The Fraunhofer IIS Audio and Multimedia division, based in Erlangen, Germany, has been working in compressed audio technology for more than 20 years and remains a leading innovator of technologies for cutting-edge multimedia systems. Fraunhofer IIS is universally credited with the development of mp3 and co-development of AAC (Advanced Audio Coding) as well as technologies for the media world of tomorrow, including MPEG Surround and the Fraunhofer Audio Communication Engine.

Through the course of more than two decades, Fraunhofer IIS has licensed its audio codec software and application-specific customizations to at least 1,000 companies. Fraunhofer estimates that it has enabled more than 5 billion commercial products worldwide using its mp3, AAC and other media technologies.

The Fraunhofer IIS organization is part of Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft, based in Munich, Germany. Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is Europe’s largest applied research organization and is partly funded by the German government. With 20,000 employees worldwide, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft is composed of 60 Institutes conducting research in a broad range of research areas.

About Sonnox

Sonnox Ltd. is the leading designer of innovative, high quality, award-winning, audio processing plug-ins for professional audio engineers. Oxford Plug-ins are used in an extraordinary range of audio applications including mixing for music production, live sound, broadcast, TV & feature film audio post production, and even scientific and forensics projects.

Sonnox Oxford Plug-ins include: The SuprEsser, a highly efficient de-esser and dynamic EQ; The Restore Suite for sophisticated audio restoration; and most recently, the revolutionary Fraunhofer Pro-Codec, a real-time plug-in for auditioning and encoding audio to multiple formats including iTunes. Sonnox continues to embrace new technology, supporting both Avid’s ProTools | HDX and Universal Audio’s UAD-2 platforms as well as most popular native workstations.

133rd AES Convention Tutorials – From ‘Noise On The Brain’ To Getting The Sound Out of (And Into) Your Head

Social Media For Engineers – Large & Small Room Acoustics – Mastering For Vinyl

SAN FRANCISCO: “The 133rd AES Convention is focused on ‘Listening, Learning and Connecting,’ reports Convention Co-Chair Valerie Tyler. Our Tutorial Program is particularly attuned to that goal. Co-Chairs Vene Garcia and Mike Wells have devoted extensive time and energy to developing a diverse and vigorous program. Their work is bound to have a lasting impact on attendee careers.”

“Our game plan was to cover as many significant issues as time would allow,” Vene Garcia remarked. “We also tried to balance the presentations with traditional and contemporary subject matter. This approach is exemplified by Bobby Owsinski’s Social Media event and Scott Hull’s Vinyl Mastering presentation.”

“Presentations on Large and Small Room Acoustics and Sound System Intelligibility actually represent a mini-track on room acoustics,” Mike Wells adds. “We believe this year’s Tutorials will genuinely benefit attendees.”

133rd AES Convention Tutorials Include:

Social Media For Engineers And Producers: Bobby Owsinski (producer/best-selling author – Facebook, Google+, Twitter and YouTube are important for developing a fan base or client list, but without the proper strategy they can prove time consuming and ineffective. Engineers, producers, and musicians will find invaluable techniques for efficiently utilizing social media as a promotional tool. Topics include: Your mailing list – old tech, new importance; Social Media management strategies; Optimizing your YouTube presence; The secret behind successful tweets and …What’s next?

Small Room Acoustics: Leading acoustic consultants Peter Mapp and Ben Kok will discuss basic small room acoustics. Issues related to absorption, reflection, diffraction, diffusion and how to use it, along with details on low frequency treatment. Recording and control room specifics and differences will be identified, including considerations for loudspeaker and microphone placement.

Large Room Acoustics: Diemer de Vries, Delft University of Technology Netherlands, (ret) & AES past president – Traditional and modern methods for describing the acoustical properties of ‘large rooms’ will be discussed. Theoretical models, measurement techniques, and the link between objective data and human perception will be covered. What issues need be addressed for a superior assessment? Reverberation time, the impulse response? Or, is there even more to take into account?

Sound System Intelligibility: Peter Mapp. Ben Kok – This comprehensive assessment of speech intelligibility and measurement will encompass how room acoustics can affect intelligibility, and measures that can optimize sound system intelligibility. Practical real world problems and solutions will be discussed in depth.

Mastering For Vinyl – Today’s Challenges: Scott Hull, Masterdisk – What has to be considered when you mix/master your music for vinyl? This Tutorial will dig deep into quality control issues and introduce sure ways to sound great on your first pressing. Topics include: Why contemporary CD mastering techniques do not produce the best sounding vinyl records; Long Sides; The relationship between Volume, Duration and Quality; The Turntable; Quality control: mixing – mastering – pressing; and, the realities of the current vinyl market.

Binaural Auditory Models: Ville Pulkki, Aalto University, Helsinki: The principles of brain mechanisms of binaural hearing have been debated extensively. In the 1990′s, common thinking was, that human binaural decoding is based on delay lines and coincidence counters. Subsequent neurophysiological findings questioned the existence of such delay lines. This tutorial will introduce the basic principles of most common binaural auditory models, and review recent improvements in the models.

Noise on the Brain Part II – Higher Fidelity: Poppy Crum, Dolby – Did you know that drinking a glass of orange juice every day might protect your hearing? Most discussions of hearing damage focus on what happens to the cochlea and inner ear. While this understanding is crucial to avoiding trauma that can lead to hearing loss, acoustic and chemical stimuli can also significantly affect higher brain areas. This session will explore new research into how this damage manifests throughout the auditory pathway as changes in hearing sensitivity, cognition, and the experience of tinnitus.

Getting the Sound Out Of (And Into) Your Head – The Practical Acoustics of Headsets: Christopher J. Struck (CEO/Chief Scientist CJS Labs, SF – Exploring the electroacoustics of headsets and other head-worn devices, this presentation will review issues ranging from Insertion Gain, to appropriate instrumentation, including ear and mouth simulators. Boom, close-talking, and noise-canceling microphone tests will be addressed, as will relevant standards, and USB, and Bluetooth wireless devices.

An overview of Audio System Grounding And Interfacing: Bill Whitlock, President/Chief Engineer, Jensen Transformers, Inc.- Equipment makers like to pretend the problems don’t exist, but unbalanced interfaces are vulnerable to noise due to an intrinsic problem. Although balanced interfaces are theoretically noise-free, they’re widely misunderstood by equipment designers, which can result in inadequate noise rejection in real-world systems. Unbalanced-to-balanced connections, RF interference and power line treatments will be discussed. Some “cures” are both illegal and deadly.

Photo 1 AES 133rd Convention Tutorial Co-Chair Vene Garcia
Photo 2 AES 133rd Convention Tutorial Co-Chair Mike Wells

The 133rd Audio Engineering Convention is set for SF’s Moscone Convention Center Friday, October 26 thru Monday, Oct. 29. For a detailed Preliminary Calendar of Events please visit: http://www.aes.org/events/133/calendar/calendar.cfm

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The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. The AES counts over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East. The organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

Perfect for orchestral recordings – the MKH 8090 wide cardioid condenser microphone from Sennheiser

Audio specialist Sennheiser is expanding its MKH studio microphone series with the addition of the MKH 8090, whose wide cardioid pick-up pattern makes it the ideal microphone for orchestral recordings. The RF condenser microphone is perfectly suited as both a main and a spot microphone. An optional screw-on module can be used to convert it into a digital AES42 microphone.

“The MKH 8090 combines omni-directional and cardioid pick-up patterns to produce an impressive orchestral microphone,” explained Kai Lange, product manager for wired microphones at Sennheiser. “Used as a main microphone, it picks up the entire sound body and a healthy proportion of room acoustics, while as a spot microphone it has sufficient directivity to screen out other sound sources without making the recording sound too ‘narrow’.”

Meticulous sound tuning
One of those responsible for fine-tuning the microphone was tonmeister Gregor Zielinsky, International Recording Applications Manager at Sennheiser: “During the development of the MKH 8090, we focused on ensuring that the sound perception of the microphone is precisely between that of the omni-directional MKH 8020 and the cardioid MKH 8040. Through further fine-tuning, we succeeded in creating a microphone with a sound that seems to ‘shine’, and which has great presence and musicality.”

Accessories for (almost) every application
The MKH 8090 benefits from the wide range of accessories available for the 8000 series, such as microphone stands with different heights, various microphone clips, a shock mount, remote cables with different lengths, windshields and accessories for ceiling mounting.

Also available as an accessory is the MZD 8000 digital module, which converts the audio signal of the MKH 8090 into a digital signal according to the AES42 standard (Mode 2) directly at the microphone head, thus ensuring a lifelike, natural sound entirely without cable losses or interference from other sources.

Sennheiser’s MKH series works according to the RF principle, which Sennheiser has been using for more than 50 years and has developed to absolute perfection, for example through the use of symmetrical transducers.

The MKH 8090 will be available in October and will cost $1,199.95.

About

The Radio magazine The Wire provides information from manufacturers and associations about industry news, products, technology and business announcements. The information shown here is posted by companies and their representatives and are not edited or previewed by the Radio magazine staff. The content providers are solely responsible for the content of their posts. If you would like your company's news and information to appear here, contact us.

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