Colorado Symphony Orchestra and Minnesota Public Radio Enhance Workflow with Neumann Digital Microphone Technology

Denver (CO), Minneapolis (MN), 24 July 2012 – Recording a large orchestral performance can involve extreme dynamic level changes, highly reverberant environments and dozens of channels of microphones, cables and associated electronic circuitry. Using traditional analog equip­ment, controlling these factors can be cumbersome, and maintaining a simple, agile workflow is often difficult. Using several dozen analog microphones onstage significantly raises the noise floor, and may introduce distortion during loud passages. Now, with Neumann’s pioneering range of digital microphones, users can experience an all-digital workflow — dramatically increasing signal integrity and user controllability.

A “Twenty-First Century Orchestra” Goes Digital

Since returning to the Colorado Symphony Orchestra (CSO) to take up the position of President/CEO, Gene Sobczak has begun to modernize the organization with an ambitious program of performances featuring pop and rock artists, recordings, webcasts and educational outreach. Sobczak has also forged relationships between Mike Pappas, a Denver-based recording engineer, and Sennheiser Electronic Corporation to ensure that every nuance of the orchestra is captured with innovative digital microphone technology from Neumann.

The CSO has already shared the stage this year with Trey Anastasio of the rock band Phish, Denver-based multi-instrumentalists DeVotchKa, and Boston-based alt-rockers Guster. In his role as volunteer engineer for the CSO, Pappas captured all three of these shows with an arsenal of Neumann digital microphones.

Realizing Agility and Simplicity

Pappas used 56 KM D series Neumann digital mics in a variety of omni-directional, cardioid and hypercardioid polar patterns. The mic list also included a Neumann KU 100 dummy head binaural stereo microphone for hall ambience, and a KMR 82 D shotgun for spot miking.

When using analog microphones and mixers, self-noise causes the noise floor to become more audible as channel counts increase. This is not the case with digital microphones however, which maintain a consistent noise floor whether one is using a single unit or three dozen units. “In a conventional analog mic setup,” says Pappas, “mix 24 channels together and the noise floor comes up by 15 dB. Now, take 56 analog microphones and you’re looking at the noise floor coming up by 20 or 25 dB. This is significantly lower when using digital microphones. With a Neumann digital microphone you go from capsule to A-to-D converter in less than an inch. What that means is that you don’t have this low level analog signal running through hundreds and hundreds of feet of cable, and then into your preamps. In the end, all the cable does is add more noise.”

Simple Workflow, Astounding Results

Pappas’ workflow is typically very simple: Neumann mics plugged into Neumann Digital Microphone Interface (DMIs), with the signals converted into MADI for transport to a DiGiCo mixing console for monitoring while recording into a computer running Apple Logic software. “The workflow is easier because there’s less stuff you need to worry about when you use digital mics,” Pappas observes. “You plug them in, fire up the software and the system pretty much runs itself. Plus we don’t have problems with things like hums and buzzes.”

“We recorded analog for many years with some of the best gear on the planet,” says Pappas. “When we switched over to full digital, the first thing we noticed was that we could hear the hall very clearly. We couldn’t hear this with analog gear because the noise floor of the gear was significantly greater than the noise floor of the hall.” Since Pappas received his first batch of Neumann digital mics back in 2004, he hasn’t looked back.

A Leading Broadcaster Forays into Digital Mics
Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), which established itself in 1967 as a classical music station, has grown to become one of the United States’ premier public radio entities and currently operates a 43-station radio network. American Public Media (APM), MPR’s parent organization, is the nation’s largest distributor of classical music programming. MPR frequently records and broadcasts the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra (SPCO) for “Performance Today,” a program that reaches 1.3 million listeners on 256 stations each week.

The SPCO is a 34-piece ensemble and the only full-time chamber orchestra in the U.S. Now in its 53rd season, the ensemble enjoys a reputation as one of the finest chamber orchestras in the world.

In early April, Cameron Wiley, MPR technical director for SPCO programming, implemented an eight-channel system at a performance by the ensemble at Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, MN. He recorded the concert to a Nuendo system using Neumann KM 183 D, KM 184 D and KM 185 D digital microphones, with the main mic array arranged in a modified Decca Tree configuration.

Since there was no rehearsal, Wiley had to take an educated guess while setting levels based on his experience recording the SPCO with his analog rig – the tympani proved troublesome. Thankfully, he recalls, the increased headroom afforded by the Neumann digital system handled the KM 143 D spot mic with no distortion. “That mic was being hit pretty hard, but it handled this very well. If we had used analog, it wouldn’t have survived those levels.”

As a longtime user of analog microphones, Wiley appreciates the benefits of an all-digital mic setup – especially the control provided by Neumann’s Remote Control Software (RCS). “Being able to control polar patterns as well as onboard DSP can be a lifesaver. Having that capability in a mic is fantastic and it certainly makes workflow much easier to deal with.”

To learn more about Neumann digital microphones, please visit http://www.neumann.com.

Image Captions:

CSO_1.jpg:
Resident Conductor Scott O’Neil conducting the Colorado Symphony Orchestra with a Neumann KM 133 D capturing the sound (photo credit: Darius Panahpour)

CSO_2.jpg:
The Neumann KM D digital microphones feature extended dynamic range and an extremely low noise floor, making them perfectly suited for orchestral recordings (photo credit: Darius Panahpour)

Neumann_KM D_family.jpg:
The Neumann KM D family of digital microphones features an agile selection of omni, cardioid and super-cardioid polar patterns

Neumann KM 184 D.jpg:
The Neumann KM 184 D was used during a recent recording by MPR

Waves Audio Joins the AVnu Alliance

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL, July 16, 2012 — Waves Audio, the industry-leading developer of professional audio digital signal processing technologies, has announced that it has become a new member of the AVnu Alliance, an industry forum dedicated to the advancement and certification of Audio/Video Bridging (AVB) devices. As part of this relationship, Waves will be a presence at AVnu events and will encourage industry adoption of AVnu’s standards campaigns. By associating with AVnu, Waves is joining such leaders as Avid™, Cisco™, Dolby®, Gibson®, GM™, Harman, Intel®, Meyer Sound®, Sennheiser, Texas Instruments, Yamaha and many more.

AVnu promotes the adoption of the IEEE 802.1 Audio/Video Bridging (AVB), and the related IEEE 1722 and IEEE 1733, standards over various networking link-layers. The organization works to create compliance test procedures and processes that ensure AVB interoperability of networked A/V devices, helping to provide the highest quality streaming A/V experience. The Alliance will promote awareness of the benefits of AVB technologies and is collaborating with other organizations and entities to make use of this work in their respective efforts to provide a better end-user A/V experience. The Alliance is focused on applications of these technologies in the Automotive, Professional and Consumer Electronics markets.

Specifically, Waves is planning to collaborate with AVnu in the following ways: by having a strong presence at industry trade shows; by participating in AVnu’s flagship “Plug Fest” events; by encouraging AVB adoption by crossing platform boundaries (when Waves SoundGrid technology runs AVB, it is immediately available to all SoundGrid users); and more.

“AVnu Alliance is pleased to announce Waves as a member,” said Lee Minich, marketing chair for the AVnu Alliance. “Waves’ hardware and software signal processing spans the studio, live sound and broadcast markets, all of which will benefit from the adoption of standards-based, truly interoperable networked audio solutions.”

“We at Waves strongly support AVnu’s goals to provide the practical means to identify equipment conformity and test interoperability, and to educate our customers as to the values and benefits of AVB-based networked systems,” stated Gilad Keren, Waves CEO and Co-Founder. “Waves is dedicated to non-proprietary and standardized interoperability between systems, allowing our customers the freedom to use their plugin products anywhere and everywhere.”

Visit www.waves.com and www.waveslive.com for more information.

Aphex® Introduces HeadPod 4™

BURBANK, CA, July 18, 2012— Aphex®, the leader in sound enhancement technology, has introduced HeadPod 4™, a compact, portable headphone amplifier capable of driving four separate stereo outputs with individual level controls from the selected input source. HeadPod 4 combines four independent Aphex stereo amplifiers and high quality converters in a rugged metal case and offers ultra low distortion and wide frequency response with headroom to spare.

Headphone amp designs built on a single channel of amplification suffer from degraded sound quality and volume levels when multiple, mismatched headphone loads are connected. HeadPod 4 overcomes the limitations of typical headphone amps through the use of four completely independent stereo amplifier channels that ensure minimum distortion and crosstalk regardless of the headphone loads connected, resulting in consistent volume levels, crystal clear audio and no clipping.

Top panel controls include a separate level control for each of the outputs together with a master level control, and an input source selector. The rear of the unit houses a pair of balanced quarter-inch jacks, a single stereo headphone extension input and a digital S/PDIF connection.

HeadPod 4 is suitable for a variety of applications, including desktop audio production, recording and broadcast studios, language labs, quality assurance listening stations, rehearsal and tuition rooms, and live sound venues such as houses of worship and schools.

Waves Audio Unveils Live Console Functionality for Version 9 Plugins

—V9 functionality expands to include compatibility with Yamaha, Allen & Heath, DiGiCo, Venue and MultiRack Native hardware —

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL, July 11, 2012 — Waves Audio, the industry-leading developer of professional audio digital signal processing technologies, has expanded the capabilities of its acclaimed V9 (Version 9), and it is now available for live use with Yamaha, Allen & Heath, DiGiCo, Venue and MultiRack Native. Featuring 64-bit support, faster scanning, faster loading, and faster processing, Waves Version 9 opens up new dimensions of high performance plugin power.

One of Version 9’s most highly anticipated features is 64-bit operating system support. Now Waves users can unleash the power of massive amounts of RAM memory in the DAW hosts of their choice. V9 also marks the introduction of Waves’ new easy-to-use authorization system, Waves License Center, which eliminates use of the iLok, ushering in an era of simplicity, flexibility, mobility and security. Waves License Center offers users authorization activation straight to their computer or any USB flash drive; easy license management; license mobility via USB flash drive or users’ License Cloud; and one-click license recovery in the case of lost or damaged devices. V9 also allows users to run V8 and V9 plugins side-by-side. New features for live use include 64-bit support and hard drive or USB flash drive activation for Yamaha and Allen & Heath consoles as well as MultiRack Native. No D-Show enabler is needed for Venue consoles.

With new V9 plugins added to Waves’ Gold, Platinum, Diamond, Horizon, SoundGrid pro and Live bundles, there’s never been a better time for users to renew their Waves Update Plan coverage. New plugins in Horizon: Kramer Master Tape; PIE Compressor; HLS Channel; Bass Rider; CLA Guitars; Maserati Drums; OneKnob Filter; and OneKnob Driver. New plugins in Diamond: GTR3 Software; OneKnob Filter; and OneKnob Driver. New plugins in Platinum: GTR3 Software and OneKnob Driver. New plugins in Gold: GTR3 Software. New in SG Pro – NLS Non-Linear Summer. New in Live Bundle – GTR3 and compatible version of PuigTec EQs for Venue.

Waves V9 is now available. Visit www.waves.com and www.waveslive.com for more information.

Sennheiser’s RF Wireless Sound Academy Seminar Comes to New York City August 6th

New York City — July 19, 2012 — Audio specialist Sennheiser announced that it will be offering its highly regarded RF Wireless Sound Academy Seminar in New York City on Monday, August 6th in mid-town Manhattan. The seminar costs $199 and includes continental breakfast, full lunch, workshop materials, and a $50 rebate coupon good for Sennheiser and Neumann products. Participants who complete the seminar will earn 6 RU CTS credits.

This single-day workshop is designed to teach attendees how to plan for trouble-free operation of multi-channel wireless microphones and wireless personal monitoring systems in even the toughest environments. Topics will include:

- RF theory plus practical tips and tricks to maximize reliability

- Reserving TV channels for events on the new FCC spectrum database system

- Best practices for system planning and frequency coordination

- Working with wireless monitoring systems

- New developments in digital RF systems

The event will feature several experts in the field including host and presenter Joe Ciaudelli and special guest Volker Schmitt: the RF engineer who spearheaded the creation of Sennheiser’s most successful and innovative products, including the popular evolution wired, evolution wireless, MKH, MKE, and 3000 and 5000 series.

Other highly qualified guest speakers include Uwe Sattler and Ben Escobedo of Sennheiser, Broadway RF and audio engineer, Andrew Funk and Henry Cohen, president and senior RF engineer at Production Radio – an RF engineering, consulting and event services firm serving entertainment, production and corporate clients. Following are details on the event and how to register:

- Where: Musicians Union Local 802, 322 W 48th St., New York City

- When: Monday, August 6th 2012 between 9:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

- Cost/registration: $199 per participant (register before July 27th and receive a $20 discount). Complete registration details, bios of guest speakers and more information at http://www.sennheiserusa.com/RFseminar.

Batwing Antennas From Alan Dick Broadcast Will Keep Legacy UHF Radio Services On-Air

Gloucestershire, United Kingdom – Alan Dick Broadcast, Ltd (ADBL) — a leading supplier of broadcast systems for digital and analog audio / video for radio and television transmission — today announced a sizeable purchase award to provide replacement antenna panels to Arqiva, a major supplier of communications infrastructure and media services to the broadcast, satellite and mobile communications markets.

ABDL will furnish a number of Batwing panels to replace legacy antennas originally installed in the 1970s. The panels, developed by ADBL in 2008, are fully compatible replacements for the original units and comply with BBC performance and technical standards formulated in 1970. Two panel sizes – the larger operating from 470 through 580 MHz and the smaller from 615 to 850 MHz – will be supplied, each having three variants with differing beam tilts. Some 1,000 antennas of this type remain operational around the UK.

“We sincerely appreciate Arqiva’s confidence in our products and engineering,” said Barry Sugden, director of Alan Dick Broadcast. “Our staff is extremely pleased to have a role in assuring the viability of these valuable radio services for many years to come.”

About Alan Dick Broadcast
UK-based Alan Dick Broadcast (ADBL) is a long-established global leader in the manufacture of antennas, combiners / filters, towers and broadcast infrastructure services for digital and analogue video and audio systems. Our portfolio starts at concept and runs through planning site development, station equipment, towers, antennas, and a full implementation and testing service. Additional information about ADBL may be obtained at: www.alandickbroadcast.com

###
ABDL contact: Sonia Del Castillo
+1-916-383-1177
sonia.delcastillo@alandickbroadcast.com

ADBL contact: Barry Sugden
+44 1242 820975 / +44 1242 820972
barry.sugden@alandickbroadcast.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener • +1-845-512-8283
harriet@desertmooncomm.com

Jampro Antennas Improves Coverage for TV Azteca in Monterrey, Mexico

Sacramento, CA – Jampro Antennas, Inc. — a world leader in the manufacture and design of radio frequency components and antennas for radio and television transmission — today announced the successful commissioning of a digital television transmission antenna system for XHWX-TV in Monterrey, Nuevo Léon, México. The station, broadcasting on analog channel 4 and digital channel 39, is an affiliate of the TV Azteca Trece network and produces regional news, programming and advertisements.

The recent installation employed Jampro’s elliptically polarized JCPD EPOL panel array for VHF Band I. The new transmission system, has significantly improved the station’s coverage. Jampro provided a turnkey solution, including the antenna, patch panel, power splitter, transmission and rigid lines, and on-site commissioning.

“Our solution was tailored to provide optimum signal strength and long-term reliability in Monterrey’s high desert climate,” said Alex Perchevitch, president of Jampro. “We are very pleased to continue our relationship with TV Azteca by welcoming their affiliate into our growing family of satisfied users.”

About Jampro
Jampro Antennas Inc., established to answer the need for quality broadcast systems at a reasonable price, is a leading supplier of antennas, combiners & filters and RF components for every application in the broadcast industry. Reputed for innovation and customization, Jampro builds each system to the specifications of the individual broadcaster. From the first system delivered in 1954 to those installed today, the Company is committed to consistent performance and quality founded on solid engineering. Today, over 15,000 broadcasters worldwide benefit from the quality and performance provided by Jampro systems. For additional JAMPRO information, please visit: www.jampro.com.

###
Jampro contact: Sonia Del Castillo
916-383-1177 • Sonia@jampro.com

Press Contact: Desert Moon Communications
Harriet Diener • 845-512-8283
harriet@desertmooncomm.com

133rd AES Historical Events Track The Test Of Time

RCA Studios – Remembering Lee de Forest – Ioan Allen, Sound On Film

SAN FRANCISCO: West Coast arbiter of audio history, Bill Wray has prepared a far-ranging Historical Program for the 133rd AES Convention set for Oct. 26-29 at the Moscone Center. “The lessons of the past remain integral components of pro audio’s on-going evolution,” remarked Convention Co-Chair Jim McTigue. “Bill Wray has always approached our Conventions with an eye towards relevance as well as variety. While today’s digital tools are generations removed from their analog antecedents, our goals for efficiency and clarity remain unchanged. This year’s Historical Program will provide our attendees with an invaluable perspective on problem solving and innovative thinking.”

133rd AES Convention Historical Events Include:

The Evolution of Electrical Recording At RCA Victor Studios 1925-1953: Presenter, Nicholas Bergh, President, Endpoint Audio Labs – This must-see presentation explores early electric recording methodology by examining the technical evolution of RCA Victor Studios. Little documentation remains of this early era or of its relatively crude and often custom-built equipment: Cryptic technical notations in recording ledgers, brief comments in memoirs, rare photos, and decades of secondhand lore. Research for this presentation focused on alternative sources, e.g. Western Electric and RCA engineering reports, manuals for leased equipment, and modern tests of restored original equipment. Although these sources are not definitive, collectively, they become quite powerful. The presentation will include images of recording equipment and rare audio clips.

Lee de Forest: The Man Who Turned Science into Art: Presenter, Mike Adams, Professor, Radio, Television, and Film, San Jose State University – After de Forest received his PhD in physics and electricity from Yale in 1899, he spent the next 30 years fashioning 19th Century science into the 20th century’s popular audio media. He added sound to Marconi’s wireless telegraph to create a radiotelephone system. He added a “B” battery and earphone to Fleming’s diode vacuum tube telegraph detector to enable the detection and amplification of sound. He added a reliable synchronized sound track to Edison’s silent film, and gave birth to the talking pictures. While he didn’t profit from this innovation, his earlier invention of the three-element vacuum tube allowed amplification of audio through loudspeakers for radio and the movies, and helped create their large public audiences.

The Replay of Historical Magnetic Tape – More than Pressing the Play Button: Presenter, Nadja Wallaszkovits, Phonogrammarchiv, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna – By exploring the various process challenges related to the transfer of historical magnetic audio tapes, this program will focus on the digitization of early audio collections. Issues covered include stages of preservation conditions, handling, and reproduction of important original tapes. In a related program,

Old Fables About Magnetic Recording Theory: Presenters, Jay McKnight and Jeff McKnight – This event will highlight some meaningful developments you may have missed over the past 60 years. These include: The story of the “effective” gap length of a reproducing head. And, a correction to Westmijze’s Gap Loss Theory; Who really discovered AC Bias? How does it actually work? And, who were the 4 groups that re-discovered it circa 1940?

The Egg Show: A Demonstration of the Artistic Uses of Sound on Film: Presenter, Ioan Allen, Senior Vice President, Dolby Laboratories – With pictures of eggs ingeniously illustrating his points, and an array of 35mm clips (replete with scratchy leader and still perfect sound), Mr. Allen describes innovative mixing and editing techniques developed over the years. Attendees will see how film sound mixers highlight a conversation in a crowd scene, how they inter-cut music to film and, how they create artificial effects that sound more real on film than on live recordings. This event will be held at Dolby Laboratories’ Theater. A limited number of $10 tickets will be available exclusively to registered convention attendees at the tours counter in the main lobby at Moscone. In addition to an Oscar, and a Samuel L. Warner Award for contributions to motion picture sound, Ioan Allen has earned Scientific and Engineering Awards from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. An AES Fellow, and recipient of the AES Silver Medal, he spearheaded breakthrough film audio formats which have revolutionized the film sound experience.

“And, though not a historical event,” Bill Wray adds, “I strongly recommend this Scott Hull tutorial, to interested attendees. The growing resurgence of vinyl makes this previously historical subject surprisingly relevant.”

Mastering For Vinyl – Today’s Challenges: Presenter, Scott Hull, Mastering Engineer, Masterdisk – In the last few years there has been a renewed interest in producing vinyl records. What are the considerations for mixing and mastering your music for vinyl? A leading mastering engineer for nearly thirty years, Hull will dig into quality control issues and discuss ways to get great sound on your first pressing.

“We are extremely fortunate to have a genuine audio pioneer serving as our Historical Committee Chair,” said Committee co-chair Valerie Tyler. “Bill Wray is one of the most knowledgeable and enthusiastic members of our team. He is an inspiration to all of us.”

Photo: 133rd AEC Convention Historical Chair Bill Wray

###

The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. The AES counts over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East. The organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

At Skaggs Place Studio in Nashville, Ricky Skaggs Depends on Neumann KH 120 Monitors to ‘Tell the Truth’

Nashville, TN – July 12, 2012: Once again, multiple GRAMMY winner and Christian artist Ricky Skaggs has been hard at work with “the boys” — his longtime band Kentucky Thunder, which have been playing bluegrass music alongside him for over 15 years. Each time Skaggs and his band enter the studio — usually at his own “Skaggs Place Studio” — the resulting music pays homage to the early trailblazers of bluegrass music, while forging entirely new paths within the seemingly timeless genre.

As an artist, Skaggs is wholly committed to authenticity and detail in his recordings. He is an avid collector of vintage microphones and esoteric gear, and constantly in pursuit of the latest sonic building blocks that will help make his recordings stand the test of time. The latest addition to his studio? The new Neumann KH 120 studio monitors. We chatted with Ricky to learn more about his recent projects, and why it’s important to have a loudspeaker that tells the truth…..

What have you been up to lately?
“Me and the boys [Kentucky Thunder] have gotten together and will be putting out a bluegrass record — the first one since Honoring the Fathers, which we recorded several years ago. We’ve cut two days of tracks, about six songs on which we are now working on overdubs. In the coming weeks, we will be doing more tracks, as well as singing and overdubs. For this record, which will have a lot of variety, I’ve brought in Gordon Kennedy [producer] for moral support. I really wanted him involved because I didn’t want it to be just another bluegrass record. Gordon is able to bring some input and creativity that I wouldn’t necessarily think to bring to the project. Beyond this, I’ve been working on a live CD of Bruce Hornsby and myself. Last time we toured, we did a lot of live recordings on the road and we’ve been going through those live shows and hope to get a record out soon.”

Tell us about your first experiences with the Neumann KH 120 monitors
“When I found out that Neumann was doing monitors, I knew they wouldn’t do anything unless it was excellent — because they have never done anything outside of excellence. If it was Neumann, it was going to be great. I first heard the KH 120s out at Winter NAMM and I was just blown away. I really loved what I was hearing. There is something in the midrange that highlights the acoustic instruments and strings, and the highs are not too bright or harsh. Finally, I just can’t believe how small they are and how great they sound.”

How about the low end?
“Typically it is a little bit harder to define the low end, but everything translates great through the KH 120s. In general, I was really impressed and surprised with their performance given their small size, and could not believe that that such clarity in the low end could be achieved without a subwoofer. The low end of my mixes sound tighter now — and in bluegrass, this is important on instruments like the upright bass and the acoustic guitar. We know that when we get to the mastering facility, that the entire low end will be nice and tight.

Why is the crossover important and how does the KH 120 perform in this regard?
“For any instrument that occupies the midrange, you’ve got to have crossovers that are extremely quick, smooth and transparent. The crossover on the Neumanns is very smooth and you can really hear this on acoustic guitars and mandolins. This is exactly what I hear from the KH 120s, and highlights the thing that I love most about them: the midrange. My instruments sound like I know they should.”

Why have the KH 120s earned a place at Skaggs Place Studio?
“I want the safety net of having a great monitor system — it takes the guesswork out of recording and mixing, and you can be more confident in what you are putting down to tape. I know the low end is there, as well as the mids and the highs. Nothing is falsified and it is the real thing. I don’t like cutting any corners — especially in the recording studio. Once you cut something and put it out, it is out there forever. As an artist, I want to make sure that the recording represented the best that I could be at that moment in time.”

You are no stranger to Neumann. Tell us about your collection of Neumann microphones

“My history with Neumann goes back a long way, and to me, the company’s microphones represent the gold standard. I have a U 47 that was once used by folks like Dolly Parton, George Jones and Johnny Cash. I also have two U 69s, which we use on everything including the piano on the recent Bruce Hornsby recording. I bought some KM 64s years ago that had been owned by a traveling gospel band, The Happy Goodman Family. My Neumann KM 66, an early version of the KM 86, is our all-time favorite guitar mic. I also use and appreciate the newer Neumann microphone models such as the TLM 102, TLM 103 and of course the M 149 and U 87.”

Photo captions:
1. Ricky Skaggs, pictured alongside the Neumann KH 120 monitor
2. The Neumann KH 120 monitors are the latest edition to Nashville’s Skaggs Place Studio

NETIA and First Gulf Extend Radio-Assist(TM) Installation at Radio Riyadh to Three Regional Sites

New NETIA Workstations at Jizan, Hail, and Tabuk Enable Easy Media Exchange With Central Riyadh Station

CLARET, France — July 12, 2012 — NETIA today announced that it is working with systems integrator First Gulf to extend the Radio-Assist(TM) 8 suite of digital audio software at Radio Riyadh to include three regional stations in Saudi Arabia, located in the cities of Jizan, Hail, and Tabuk. Part of a larger multi-year national media infrastructure project overseen by the Saudi Ministry of Culture and Information (MOCI), the extension of Radio-Assist brings more sophisticated production tools to the three stations and simplifies their exchange of media with the kingdom’s central Radio Riyadh station. NETIA technology already plays a key role in the restoration, digitization, and preservation of audiovisual media of cultural and historical importance in Saudi Arabia.

“We are proud to be working with NETIA to extend state-of-the-art production and broadcast capabilities to regional stations and to facilitate and streamline the exchange of content between the country’s radio broadcasters,” said Naim G. Saidi, CEO of First Gulf Company.

The Radio-Assist 8 range of digital audio software programs covers the entire operation of a radio station, addressing acquisition, sound file editing, commercial and music production, scheduling, multicasting, data security, and administration. The installation of Radio-Assist at Jizan, Hail, and Tabuk ensures the interoperability of media management systems across broadcast stations and provides the foundation for shared access to the extensive national archives being created by MOCI.

“Saudi Arabia is undertaking an ambitious upgrade to its national media infrastructure, and we’re pleased to be a part of this project,” said Thomas Dresch, project manager at NETIA. “With this latest NETIA installation, key radio stations across the country have been able improve their local production capabilities while taking much greater advantage of resources and programming at Radio Riyadh.”

More information about NETIA and its products is available at www.netia.com.

# # #

About NETIA
NETIA, a GlobeCast company, is a leading provider of software solutions that enable efficient management and delivery of content to today’s full array of media platforms. Relied on by more than 10,000 users in 200 installations in more than 40 countries, NETIA solutions allow content producers and owners to manage content from ingest to delivery, targeting multiplatform outlets including the Internet, VOD, IPTV services, and mobile devices.

NETIA provides content management solutions to major radio and television brands and multimedia groups around the world. Clients include BSkyB, RAI Italy, Radio Oman, France Telecom/Orange, RTM Malaysia, Mediacorp Singapore, RTL, Radio France, the Associated Press, France Televisions, and L’Équipe 24/24. NETIA has its headquarters in France, with offices in the United States, Paris, Rome, and Singapore, in addition to a global network of professional distribution partners.

ENDS

About

The Radio magazine The Wire provides information from manufacturers and associations about industry news, products, technology and business announcements. The information shown here is posted by companies and their representatives and are not edited or previewed by the Radio magazine staff. The content providers are solely responsible for the content of their posts. If you would like your company's news and information to appear here, contact us.

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