Graham Blyth To Present AES 132nd Convention Heyser Lecture

In Pursuit of Elegant Simplicity: Life, Luck, and Learning in Music and Audio

BUDAPEST: Graham Blyth, internationally recognized Organist and accomplished professional audio equipment designer, will present the Audio Engineering Society’s Richard C. Heyser Lecture on Friday, April 27, 7:00PM – 9:PM at the Budapest Congress & World Trade Center. After successful conventions in London, Paris, Munich, Amsterdam and other major cities throughout Europe, the 132nd marks the first AES Convention to be held in Budapest.

A prime example of the AES ‘Listen, Learn, Connect’ initiative, Blyth’s Heyser lecture will describe his journey from audio design engineer to developer of Soundcraft Mixing consoles, with a special focus on his approach to mic preamp design. Blyth will also address the importance of the analog engineer in a mostly digital world and, the technical and musical challenges associated with designing high-quality digital classical organs.

As co-founder with Phil Dudderidge of UK-based Soundcraft, designers and manufacturers of highly regarded audio mixing consoles, Mr. Blyth has served as Technical Director of the firm since its inception in 1973. Harman bought the company in 1988, and it continues to maintain an outstanding position in a corporate family that includes JBL, DBX, Lexicon, AKG and Studer.

In addition to his technical virtuosity, Mr. Blyth is an esteemed concert artist who has performed in such celebrated venues as NYC’s St. Thomas Church; the Cathedral of Our Lady of Los Angeles; Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, and many of Europe’s most renowned cathedrals. In 1995 he built the Challow Park Recital Hall, a unique 80-seat auditorium with completely variable acoustics. In 2003 he founded the Veritas Organ Company to address the new generation of digital classical organs. Mr. Blyth is a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and of the Audio Engineering Society.

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Photo: Celebrated Organist and accomplished professional audio equipment designer, Graham Blyth will present the AES Richard C. Heyser Lecture on April 27 in Budapest.

The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. With over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East, the organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

132nd AES Convention – Budapest Congress & World Trade Center – Apr. 26-29, 2012

Elevation Church Embraces Recent Sennheiser Endorsement, while Putting New Neumann KK 205 Microphone Capsules to the Test

Charlotte, NC – April 18, 2012: Recognized by Outreach Magazine as one of the fastest-growing churches in the United States, Elevation Church serves over 10,000 congregants each weekend and maintains six worship campuses — four of which are ‘portable.’ To keep pace with this growth, Elevation has had to establish itself on a solid technology footing and has maintained a strong relationship with Sennheiser since opening its doors in 2005. Recently, Elevation became an official Sennheiser endorsed worship facility and was among the first to put the new Neumann KK 205 capsules — which are designed for the Sennheiser 2000 series wireless transmitters — through their paces.

Brian Poole is technical director at Elevation Church and has worked closely with Sennheiser to ensure that the clarity and sonic integrity of the facility is all that it can be, no matter which campus congregants are attending. Recently, Elevation added five Neumann KK 205 microphone capsules to its arsenal of live performance and recording tools. Poole discusses how he has helped Elevation continue to deliver superior sound with Sennheiser and Neumann.

Can you describe some of the challenges that go along with the growth that Elevation has experienced?
We are six years old and have six campuses in the Charlotte area. All in all, we are running at about 10 or 11 thousand people every weekend. With that growth, there have been a lot of rapid changes we have had to make, especially considering that audio is a very big part of what we do. Sennheiser has been there for us the entire time and has provided the best product and support we could ask for — and even more so now that we are endorsed. A big challenge as a multi-campus church is ensuring that we will have gear that we know will be reliable and sound great. Four of our campuses are portable, so we are lugging gear in and out all weekend; when we plug it all in and turn it on, we know it is going to work. Sennheiser has also helped us through our RF coordination, which can be very complex.

How familiar are you with Neumann microphone capsules?
We have always loved Neumann microphones and already had the KK 105 capsules on our pastor’s [Steven Furtick] speaking mic with a Sennheiser SKM 5200 transmitter. Our pastor does a lot of singing as well, and the performance of the SKM 5200 / KK 105 combination has been fantastic. By making a Neumann capsule that works with an SKM 2000 transmitter is really a game changer for us. Now we can have Neumann sound not only for the pastor, but all our other lead singers and it is a very economical solution.

Tell me about your first impressions with the KK 205s.
We just received them three weeks ago, and they are already on our primary lead vocal microphones [used in combination with the Sennheiser SKM 2000 handheld transmitters] at our two permanent campuses. One of these campuses is a warehouse with low ceilings, and the acoustics aren’t ideal. The KK 205 has a supercardioid pattern so we are able to get plenty of gain before feedback — this is huge for us because we like it loud and we like it to sound good. I was 100 percent comfortable that I could take the KK 205 right to the stage without going through weeks of rehearsals first.

For our Easter service, the new Neumann capsules went into our broadcast facility. We have a big spoken word element in our Easter service, and this is the first thing right out of the gate during our worship experience. All our main worship leaders were on the KK 205s and the feed went out to all six of our campuses. It was also put online for everyone to see and participate in. Everything worked out great and all the voices were very rich.

Do you intend to use the KK 205s in other applications?
We do a lot of recording both for CDs and streaming on our website. In fact, our worship band has just signed a pretty big record deal and we expect the KK 205s and the SKM 2000s will be used on future live recordings. Our first live album and live DVD was a big deal for us and it is very exciting that Sennheiser has released a ‘Neumann for the Masses,’ if you will.

How has your experience been with Sennheiser overall, including with the new Neumann KK 205s?
First of all, Sennheiser has rock solid RF and the sound quality is best of the best. We’ve got 36 channels in our auditorium of Sennheiser wireless and I’ve never had a single issue of anything dropping out. Now, with the KK 205s, we can put Neumann performance in the reach of all our singers, increasing the overall quality of our worship experience. Audio quality has always been an incredibly important component of worship for Elevation Church and the KK 205 capsules truly represent quality for the masses — the cost/performance ratio cannot be beat. All in all, our relationship with Sennheiser has been fantastic and we feel very blessed.

Caption:
Brad Hudson, Worship Leader at Elevation Church, uses a KK 205 on a SKM 2000 during Easter rehearsals at Elevation’s Blakeney campus.

Sound Devices Unveils New PIX-DOCK at the 2012 NAB Show

Data Dock for PIX-CADDY with Thunderbolt Connection

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 18, 2012 — Sound Devices, experts in portable audio and video products for field production, unveils PIX-DOCK at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C2546). PIX-DOCK connects drives mounted in a Sound Devices PIX-CADDY to computers equipped with Thunderbolt™ high-speed I/O over a single Thunderbolt cable.<

The PIX-CADDY, which is used to connect SSD volumes to all PIX recorders, is an SSD mounting accessory that also operates as a multi-format interface to attach the SSD to a computer for file transfer and management. With the introduction of the PIX-DOCK, users can now leverage Thunderbolt’s fast transfer speeds between drives and computers. Thunderbolt offers up to 10 Gbps interconnection speeds, making the file copying of large-capacity drives fast and easy. When using fast storage drives, its high throughput allows realtime playback of multiple streams of high-data-rate video.

The PIX-DOCK provides both power and data over a single cable and is compatible with SATA drives. PIX-DOCK includes a six-foot Thunderbolt cable that connects to the PIX-CADDY using its eSATAp connection. It also offers a secure, latching connection to PIX-CADDY, and its weighted base prevents sliding on desktop surfaces.

“PIX-DOCK simplifies and speeds the transfer and management of files when using our PIX recorders,” says Jon Tatooles, managing director at Sound Devices. “By utilizing Thunderbolt, we are able provide our users with blazing fast and reliable transfers.”

The PIX 220, PIX 240 and PIX 260 record directly to QuickTime using Apple’s ProRes or Avid’s DNxHD codecs. Since PIX recorders use ProRes and DNxHD, files recorded in the field can be used directly in post production, making the workflow simple and fast. The PIX 240 and PIX 260 add even more flexibility, with their time code, sync generator, and simultaneous SDI and HDMI outputs. All PIX recorders bring the company’s award-winning audio expertise and performance to their video products.

Sound Devices, LLC designs and manufactures portable audio mixers, digital audio recorders, and digital video recorders and related equipment for feature film, episodic television, documentary, news-gathering, and acoustical test and measurement applications. The thirteen-year old company designs and manufactures from their Reedsburg, Wisconsin headquarters with additional offices in Madison, WI and Highland Park, IL. For more information, visit the Sound Devices website, www.sounddevices.com.

Clear-Com Introduces Tempest2400 Masterbelt at the 2012 NAB Show

All the Capabilities of the Tempest2400 BaseStation in a Compact and Portable Package

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 18, 2012 ? Clear-Com, a global leader in critical voice communication systems, today announces the Tempest2400 MasterBelt digital wireless intercom at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C8008). Ideal for mobile productions, the Tempest2400 MasterBelt offers all the advanced features, reliability and robustness of the Tempest2400 rack-mount BaseStation, including the new version 3.0 features, in a compact, portable and easy-to-deploy package that can be conveniently worn on the hip.

The Tempest2400 MasterBelt provides mobile broadcasters the ability to coordinate and communicate hands-free within the form of a Tempest2400 BeltStation. The MasterBelt can be paired with any standard Tempest2400 CP-222 two-channel BeltStation to create a full-featured two-channel system in the 2.4 GHz band. The MasterBelt itself also functions as a BeltStation allowing up to six full-duplex wireless users to be in communications.

Designed to be comfortable, rugged and robust, the MasterBelt Station and all Tempest BeltStations can operate in harsh weather conditions and are protected by a durable, weather-resistant ABS co-polymer blend with a high performance polyurethane overmold. The MasterBelt is provided with a rechargeable Li-Polymer battery capable of up to eight hours of operation or can be powered by three Standard AA Alkaline batteries as backup, providing four hours of operations.

“The Tempest2400 system has proven itself as the “go-to” communications solution for remote productions operating interference-free even when other wireless devices are in the same vicinity,” says Craig Frederickson, Clear-Com wireless product manager. “The MasterBelt is the latest development in the Tempest2400 line, giving broadcasters an even more flexible alternative for mobile productions, such as reality TV, sports sideline communications or ENG, where a stationary BaseStation is not desirable, feasible or optimal.”

Tempest2400 operates in 80MHz of spectrum in the 2.4GHz ISM frequency band. Tempest wireless systems will not interfere with traditional wireless microphone, IFB or in-ear monitor systems that operate in the UHF TV band. Because of Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) technology, the Tempest system does not compete with signals from other 2.4 GHz wireless devices, minimizing frequency coordination and enabling flawless performance. Further, with state-of-the-art Redundant Data Transmit (2xTX), which sends each packet of audio data twice on different frequencies, the system ensures uninterrupted audio communications.

Similar to all Tempest systems the Tempest MasterBelt offers three modes of operations: Normal, Shared and Split. Because the MasterBelt can also function as a BeltStation, up to six full-duplex wireless users can be in communication in Normal mode. In Shared mode, an unlimited number of wireless users can listen while five have PTT capability. In Split mode, four wireless users are full-duplex talk while an unlimited number may listen. The ‘fifth user slot’ is an unlimited single-channel shared between the users with momentary talk buttons only.

About Clear-Com
Clear-Com, an HME company, is a global provider in professional voice communications systems since 1968. We develop and market proven intercom technologies such as Analog & Digital Partyline, Digital Matrix, Wireless and Intercom-over-IP systems for critical communication applications in broadcast, performance venues, military, government and enterprise markets. Recognized for our legacy of intercom innovations, production teams around the world have come to depend on Clear-Com for clear, reliable and scalable communications solutions. For more information, please visit www.clearcom.com.

About HME
HM Electronics, Inc. is a diverse group of companies providing solutions that enhance productivity and customer service in markets including restaurants, sports and professional audio. Founded in 1971, we sell, service and support products in 89 countries worldwide, via company-owned offices in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and China, and an extensive network of HME-authorized distributors, dealers and service agents. Every day quick service restaurants take over 24 million orders using HME systems. With the recent acquisition of Clear-Com, HME is the world’s leading provider of professional intercom systems. To learn more, visit www.hme.com.

Sound Devices Introduces Next-Generation Functionality for PIX 240 at the 2012 NAB Show

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 17, 2012 — Sound Devices, experts in portable audio and video products for field production, is pleased to introduce new functionality for its popular PIX 240 portable audio/video recorder at the 2012 NAB Show (Booth C2546). This latest firmware update, Version 2, now makes PIX 240 even more powerful with the addition of several monitoring features.

Sound Devices PIX 240 firmware Version 2 now enables users to monitor images in varying exposures through Exposure Assist, a feature that allows for false-color and zebra-stripes viewing. It is also equipped with Focus Assist, which includes a peaking filter and 1:1 pixel zoom. Monitor brightness, contrast and chroma adjustments are also now available. Version 2 of PIX 240 also includes standard definition recording (NTSC and PAL) and support for using simultaneous analog and SDI/HDMI audio inputs. These new features are available as a free firmware update to all PIX 240 users and can be downloaded by visiting http://www.sounddevices.com/download/pix-firmware.htm.

“Our new PIX line of audio/video recorders have received overwhelming support and interest from the industry as a whole,” says Jon Tatooles, managing director at Sound Devices. “We have listened to our customers’ needs and requests and are excited to officially launch Version 2 of PIX 240 at this year’s NAB show.”

PIX 240 is the perfect companion to a wide range of professional cameras used for feature films such as ARRI and RED as well as small-format HD cameras from Sony and Canon. PIX 240 connects to cameras with HDMI or SDI and records directly to QuickTime using Apple’s ProRes or Avid’s DNxHD codec. Since PIX recorders use Apple ProRes and Avid DNxHD, files recorded in the field can be used directly in post production, making the workflow simple and fast. PIX 240 includes a built-in Ambient Clockit time-code generator/reader with genlock output for multi-camera and double-system sound applications. The source time-code can be derived from the SDI stream, from an external source or from the built-in generator in PIX 240. Additional features include digital audio inputs on AES3 and an external eSATAp connection for direct connection to large SATA drives.

Sound Devices, LLC designs and manufactures portable audio mixers, digital audio recorders, and digital video recorders and related equipment for feature film, episodic television, documentary, news-gathering, and acoustical test and measurement applications. The thirteen-year old company designs and manufactures from their Reedsburg, Wisconsin headquarters with additional offices in Madison, WI and Highland Park, IL. For more information, visit the Sound Devices website, www.sounddevices.com.

Clear-Com Launches Helixnet Partyline at the 2012 NAB Show

World’s First Networked Partyline Intercom System Delivers Greater Efficiency, More Flexibility and Cost-Savings Through the Revolutionary Platform Design

LAS VEGAS, APRIL 17, 2012 Clear-Com, a global leader in critical voice communication systems, is pleased to announce the formal, worldwide release of the HelixNet Partyline Intercom System at the 2012 NAB show (Booth C8008). HelixNet Partyline is the industry’s first networked partyline intercom system with a set of unique capabilities for achieving greater efficiency, cost-savings and flexibility from set up to operation and maintenance. The initial release of HelixNet Partyline consists of the HMS-4X Main Station, HBP-2X HelixNet Beltpack, HLI-2W2 Two-wire Interface Module and the HLI-4W2 Four-wire Interface Module. The system begins shipping in June of 2012.

HelixNet Partyline is the first set of products to demonstrate a revolutionary platform with the superb audio clarity of the digitized Clear-Com sound, central administration of the entire system (firmware upgrades and maintenance) from the Main Station with a single cable and flexible cable options with the ability to leverage an existing cable infrastructure.

“For over 40 years, the Pro Audio community has been using the common, three-pin XLR microphone cable to carry audio for analog partyline systems,” says Chris Barry, Product Manager at Clear-Com. “In order to preserve our customers’ investments in intercom systems and cabling infrastructure, we had specifically designed HelixNet Partyline to transmit four channels of digital quality audio, plus program and power for beltpacks, over a single, shielded twisted-pair cable (ex. microphone cable, CAT5 or CAT6 cable). This capability alone is unprecedented in the history of intercom technology.”

Furthermore, the HelixNet Partyline system offers many unique features to create a much higher audio quality, increase efficiency during the set up and maintenance processes and simplify operations.

HMS-4X HelixNet Main Station and Interface Module

High channel density and high user capacity. The sleek 1RU HMS-4X HelixNet Main Station fits into any standard 19” rack and can provide power and four channels of audio to support up to 20 digital beltpacks.

No hum. No buzz. Unlike standard analog systems, the all-digital HelixNet system is immune to electro-magnetic interference and ground loops.

Highly flexible and offers intuitive user operations. System settings and menus are quickly accessible. Firmware maintenance and upgrades can be achieved easily via USB ports.

Greater connectivity with existing analog intercom systems and audio devices. The expansion bay in the Main Station allows optional HLI-2W2 two-wire and HLI-4W2 four-wire interface modules to connect easily with existing analog intercom systems and audio devices, while preserving the high audio quality that is free of hum and noise.

HBP-2X HelixNet Beltpack
High channel density and selectable channels to save resources. The rugged, ergonomically-designed HBP-2X HelixNet Beltpack is a two-channel beltpack that can access two of any four system channels and program audio over a single cable, along with individual level control. Networked audio is distributed over a single, shielded twisted pair, keeping the number of cables required, low.

Easy to operate and read. Optimally positioned buttons and volume knobs are easy to locate, identify and control on the beltpack. Channel labels are simple to read on the high-contrast 10-character OLED displays. Beltpacks can be set up in daisy chain or star configurations with no need for active split boxes.

Highly durable and flexible. HelixNet Beltpacks are highly durable, fabricated from lightweight cast aluminum, and come with a sturdy beltclip, rubber bumpons and an integrated strap guide to offer a variety of practical mounting options.

About Clear-ComClear-Com, an HME company, is a global provider in professional voice communications systems since 1968. We develop and market proven intercom technologies such as Analog & Digital Partyline, Digital Matrix, Wireless and Intercom-over-IP systems for critical communication applications in broadcast, performance venues, military, government and enterprise markets. Recognized for our legacy of intercom innovations, production teams around the world have come to depend on Clear-Com for clear, reliable and scalable communications solutions. For more information, please visit www.clearcom.com.

About HMEHM Electronics, Inc. is a diverse group of companies providing solutions that enhance productivity and customer service in markets including restaurants, sports and professional audio. Founded in 1971, we sell, service and support products in 89 countries worldwide, via company-owned offices in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and China, and an extensive network of HME-authorized distributors, dealers and service agents. Every day quick service restaurants take over 24 million orders using HME systems. With the recent acquisition of Clear-Com, HME is the world’s leading provider of professional intercom systems. To learn more, visit www.hme.com.

132nd AES Convention Offers Diverse Tutorials

From Beach Boys Smile Sessions To Notes On The Brain

BUDAPEST: A destination for listening, learning and connecting, the 132nd AES Convention, will feature a uniquely varied assemblage of Tutorials. Scheduled for April 26-29 at the Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center, the gathering will draw attendees from around the world.

Tutorial Event highlights include:

The Making of The Beach Boys Smile Sessions: Arguably the greatest “lost” album of all time, The Beach Boys’ Smile sessions were finally released last November, in a variety of CD, vinyl and other digital configurations. Producer/Educator Barry Marshall will conduct a rare interview with Project co-producer Mark Linett about the legendary 1966-67 sessions. Their discussion will include the producer role Brian Wilson played in the project, as well a look at the technical and logistical challenges of mixing and mastering this landmark production from 45-year-old tapes at different configurations, speeds and sizes.

Noise on the Brain-Hearing Damage on the Other Side: Presenter: Poppy Crum – Did you know that drinking a glass of orange juice every day may actually protect your hearing? Most discussions of hearing damage focus on what happens to the cochlea and inner ear. While this understanding is crucial to predicting and avoiding trauma that can lead to hearing loss, this session will explore the latest research regarding the effects of acoustic and chemical trauma. It will also consider recent research in chemically preserving hearing and combating these conditions.

How Does It Sound Now? The Evolution of Audio: Presenter: Gary Gottlieb – One day Chet Atkins was playing guitar when a woman approached him. She said, “That guitar sounds beautiful.” Chet immediately quit playing and asked, “How does it sound now?” The quality of sound in Chet’s case clearly rested with the player, not the instrument. The technical and aesthetic quality of recorded music lies with engineers and producers, not solely on their equipment. This Tutorial will address the differences and similarities between their standards for excellence.

Please visit http://www.aes.org/events/132/calendar/calendar.cfm for a complete list of event titles, abstracts and presentation times.

Photo: Novotel Budapest Congress & World Trade Center hosts the AES Convention April 26-29.

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The Audio Engineering Society was formed in 1948 by a group of concerned audio engineers. With over 14,000 members throughout the U.S., Latin America, Europe, Japan and the Far East, the organization serves as the pivotal force in the exchange and dissemination of technical information for the industry. For additional information visit http://www.aes.org

Neumann Introduces KK 204 and KK 205 Microphone Capsules, Designed to Complement Sennheiser’s 2000 Series Wireless Handheld Transmitter

Old Lyme, Conn. – April 16, 2012: Premium audio brand Neumann announced that it will be showcasing its new KK 204 and KK 205 microphone capsules at the Sennheiser booth [C2632] during NAB 2012. The new capsules, which are available in cardioid (KK 204) and supercardioid (KK 205) patterns, are compatible with Sennheiser’s 2000 series of wireless handheld transmitters.

The acoustic features of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads are derived from the multiple award-winning wired Neumann stage microphones, the KMS 104 and KMS 105. The KK 204, with its cardioid pattern, ensures the best possible suppression of sound originating from 180 degrees to the rear, while the supercardioid KK 205 has greater directivity, and maximizes incident sound from the front as compared to sound from the rear. Due to the “single polar pattern design,” the polar patterns are very uniform over the entire frequency range and provide excellent resistance to feedback.

Wolfgang Fraissinet, President of Neumann, commented: “Neumann capsules have already been used in combination with the Sennheiser SKM 5200 handheld transmitter for the past 10 years on some of the largest stages of the world, where the highest demands are placed on a high-resolution sound and transmission reliability. With the development of the KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads, the Neumann sound is now also available for the Sennheiser 2000 Series. The synergies between the key areas of expertise of Sennheiser handheld transmitters and Neumann capsule sound permit us to offer our customers a wireless system of absolutely uncompromisingly quality, even for the most demanding live applications.”

In developing the new capsules, particular importance was placed on the effective damping of pop sounds and handling noise, as well as on the extremely low level of self-noise. The KK 204 and KK 205 capsule heads also have an extremely wide dynamic range and were designed to be very easy to service.

The aesthetic design complements the construction of the SKM 2000 handheld transmitter, and each capsule — like the SKM 2000 transmitter — is available in both nickel and black finishes. Each capsule includes a large nylon bag designed to hold the capsules, the handheld transmitter, battery packs and additional accessories.

    Both the KK 204 and KK 205 feature:

Reduced handling noise: Very low sensitivity to handling noise with a steep roll-off from approximately 78 Hz
Reduced plosives and sibilance: Both capsules feature a foam-lined grille to ensure smooth sound
Wide dynamic range with high SPL capability: 126 dB-A of dynamic range with 150 dB MAX SPL
Low feedback: Incredibly smooth and flat frequency response provided high gain before feedback
Easy to service components: Neumann understands the rigors of the road and has made the KK 204 and KK 205 exceptionally robust but easy to service if necessary

    Specifications:

Directional pattern: Cardioid (KK 204) / Super-cardioid (KK 205)
Frequency range: 40 Hz – 20 kHz
Sensitivity (at 1 kHz into 1 k?): 2.8 mV/Pa ± 1 dB
Equivalent noise level, CCIR1): 35 dB
Equivalent noise level, A-weighted1): 24 dB-A Max. SPL for 0.5% THD2) 150 dB
Dynamic range (A-weighted): >126 dB-A
Weight (including transmitter and power supply unit): Approx. 17.6 oz.
Dimensions (including SKM 2000)/length: 10.7 in., ø 2.2 in.

1) according to IEC 60268-1; CCIR-weighting according to CCIR 468-3, quasi peak; A-weighting according to IEC 61672-1, RMS
2) measured as equivalent el. input signal

Sennheiser adds the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter to its evolution wireless series

Old Lyme, Conn.–April 16, 2012– Audio specialist Sennheiser is extending its evolution wireless ew 300 G3 series with the addition of the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter. Whether it is for a speaker’s podium or for fast mobile use in video productions, the SKP 300 G3 converts any conventional cabled microphone quickly and easily into a wireless version. The phantom power required by condenser microphones is also supplied by the rugged transmitter – a highly versatile device that enables cabled microphones to become wireless with ease.

“With the new SKP 300 G3, we are further expanding the application possibilities for the evolution wireless series,” explained Robb Blumenreder, channel manager for professional systems products at Sennheiser’s U.S. headquarters. “The plug-on transmitter comes with its own phantom power supply, enabling it to be combined with any microphone with an XLR-3 output.”

For applications in the Installed Sound sector, the plug-on transmitter can be combined with an EM 300 G3 rack-mount receiver, thus making it possible, for example, to have a speaker’s podium without the visual interference of cables or to implement mobile lecterns. For video journalists, the SKP 300 G3 is an ideal partner for the EK 100 G3 camera receiver.

The SKP 300 is powered by two AA batteries or the optional BA 2015 accupack. The plug-on transmitter is available in eight frequency ranges, and is quickly and easily synchronized with its receiver using an infrared link.

The SKP 300 will be available in April 2012.

Caption:
SKP 300.jpg: Wireless with ease: the SKP 300 G3 plug-on transmitter with switchable phantom power turns cabled microphones into wireless ones in next to no time

Technical Data: SKP 300

Modulation wideband FM
Frequency ranges A: 516–558 MHz; G: 566–608; GB: 606–648 MHz;
B: 626–668 MHz; C: 734–776 MHz; D: 780–822 MHz;
E: 823-865 MHz

Frequency banks 20 frequency banks each with up to 24
intermodulation-free presets; 6 frequency banks
with up to 24 frequencies freely selectable by the user
in 25 kHz steps
(Please note that the EK 100 G3 camera receiver has
only twelve frequencies per channel bank)

Switching bandwidth 42 MHz
RF output power 10/30 mW
Nominal/peak deviation ±24 kHz/±48 kHz
Phantom power 48 V ± 2 V
Compander system HDX
Audio frequency response 80–18,000 Hz
THD 0.9%
Signal-to-noise ratio > 120 dBA (1 mV peak deviation)
Audio input XLR-3F, balanced
Power supply 2 AA batteries (1.5 V) or BA 2015 accupack
Operating time typ. 8 hrs (30 mW RF power, without P48)
Dimensions 105 x 43 x 43 mm
Weight with batteries 195 g

Audio-Technica Offers More Reasons to Get Your Own Mic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3mcRXHAlbs&list=UU4Zvo2MGFsv-83wf40pG7Ig

Audio-Technica’s second humorous public service announcement graphically illustrates why NOT to share vocal microphones. Just like the first video, this new clip is an irreverent demonstration on why singers having their own microphones should be a basic right. Please take a look at this video, and feel free to post to your website, share on Facebook, add to newsletters, tweet or pass along to friends. Watch the video HERE

Audio-Technica has also prepared a new “Get Your Own Mic” landing page at http://www.audio-technica.com/getyourownmic, where visitors will be able to learn more about Audio-Technica’s vocal mics, and, of course, watch these acclaimed shorts.

About

The Radio magazine The Wire provides information from manufacturers and associations about industry news, products, technology and business announcements. The information shown here is posted by companies and their representatives and are not edited or previewed by the Radio magazine staff. The content providers are solely responsible for the content of their posts. If you would like your company's news and information to appear here, contact us.

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